2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163518
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV/AIDS-related Knowledge and Attitudes of Nepali Nursing Students
Author(s):
Eller, Lucille; Mahat, Ganga
Author Details:
Lucille Eller, PhD, RN, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Camden, New Jersey, USA, email: eller@nightingale.rutgers.edu; Ganga Mahat, EdD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes of Nepali nursing students in each program. Methods: Descriptive, correlational design. Following informed consent, data were collected from a convenience sample of 127 nursing students. Measures: 45 item HIV Knowledge Questionnaire (alpha=.78), the HIV Attitudes questionnaire (alpha=.73). Possible score for the HIV-K-Q was 0-45; on the attitudes questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 54. Higher scores indicated more knowledge or negative attitudes. Results: Participants were first year (n=50) or third year (n=49) nursing certificate students or first year (n=28) nursing BS students. All were female; the majority was Hindu (93.7%). 43% had been asked to care for someone with HIV/AIDS and 3.9% had refused; 91% would be willing to care for a person with HIV/AIDS. Mean correct knowledge responses were 32.3(SD3.7), range 25-38 for BS students; for certificate students 26.6 (SD4.14), range 17-36. There was no significant difference in negative attitudes across groups (F= .09, df=2; p=.91). There was a significant between group difference in knowledge (F=33.5, df=2, p=.000). Mean attitude scores were 22.2 (SD 3.5) range 16-29 for BS students and mean 21.8 (SD4.4) range 8-33 for certificate students. 42% of all respondents agreed that people who have HIV/AIDS deserve their fate, 28% thought that people with HIV/AIDS should be quarantined, and 6% agreed that "It is better for everyone if AIDS patients kill themselves." Conclusions and Implications: There is still a large knowledge gap in Nepali nursing students regardless of level of education even though BS students have already been in practice for a minimum of three years. Nepali culture is sexually conservative, therefore knowledge about HIV disease for nursing students must be culturally relevant. Although students are willing to care for people with HIV/AIDS, attitudes are negative at both levels of education and blame and stigma persist. Nepal is poised at the brink of a growing epidemic in Southeast Asia, and nurses are the primary caregivers for PLWHIV. Nursing curricula must include, and faculty must deliver adequate and appropriate HIV/AIDS related content to nursing students at all levels of study. Education and research can be combined for optimum enhancement of knowledge and attitudes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV/AIDS-related Knowledge and Attitudes of Nepali Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEller, Lucilleen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahat, Gangaen_US
dc.author.detailsLucille Eller, PhD, RN, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Camden, New Jersey, USA, email: eller@nightingale.rutgers.edu; Ganga Mahat, EdD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163518-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes of Nepali nursing students in each program. Methods: Descriptive, correlational design. Following informed consent, data were collected from a convenience sample of 127 nursing students. Measures: 45 item HIV Knowledge Questionnaire (alpha=.78), the HIV Attitudes questionnaire (alpha=.73). Possible score for the HIV-K-Q was 0-45; on the attitudes questionnaire scores ranged from 0 to 54. Higher scores indicated more knowledge or negative attitudes. Results: Participants were first year (n=50) or third year (n=49) nursing certificate students or first year (n=28) nursing BS students. All were female; the majority was Hindu (93.7%). 43% had been asked to care for someone with HIV/AIDS and 3.9% had refused; 91% would be willing to care for a person with HIV/AIDS. Mean correct knowledge responses were 32.3(SD3.7), range 25-38 for BS students; for certificate students 26.6 (SD4.14), range 17-36. There was no significant difference in negative attitudes across groups (F= .09, df=2; p=.91). There was a significant between group difference in knowledge (F=33.5, df=2, p=.000). Mean attitude scores were 22.2 (SD 3.5) range 16-29 for BS students and mean 21.8 (SD4.4) range 8-33 for certificate students. 42% of all respondents agreed that people who have HIV/AIDS deserve their fate, 28% thought that people with HIV/AIDS should be quarantined, and 6% agreed that "It is better for everyone if AIDS patients kill themselves." Conclusions and Implications: There is still a large knowledge gap in Nepali nursing students regardless of level of education even though BS students have already been in practice for a minimum of three years. Nepali culture is sexually conservative, therefore knowledge about HIV disease for nursing students must be culturally relevant. Although students are willing to care for people with HIV/AIDS, attitudes are negative at both levels of education and blame and stigma persist. Nepal is poised at the brink of a growing epidemic in Southeast Asia, and nurses are the primary caregivers for PLWHIV. Nursing curricula must include, and faculty must deliver adequate and appropriate HIV/AIDS related content to nursing students at all levels of study. Education and research can be combined for optimum enhancement of knowledge and attitudes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:57Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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