2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163519
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prenatal Anxiety and ChildrenÆs Neurobehavioral and Emotional Problems
Author(s):
Feng, Jui-Ying; Kitzman, Harriet; Cole, Robert; Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly
Author Details:
Jui Ying Feng, RN, DNS, PNP, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Rochester School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: juiying@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Harriet Kitzman, RN, PhD; Robert Cole, PhD; Kimberly Sidora-Arcoleo, MPH
Abstract:
Purpose: Animal studies suggest that prenatal anxiety or stress has a direct and/or indirect impact on behavioral and emotional problems of offspring. Most human studies of the impact of prenatal anxiety have been focused on Caucasian populations and used self-report measures for both predictor and outcome variables. The study purposes were to describe the relationship between prenatal anxiety and children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes over time, and to explore the sex differences in these effects on children's outcomes. Methods: Secondary data analyses from a longitudinal, randomized trial of nurse home visiting services were conducted using correlation and regression procedures. The analyses were conducted on a predominantly low-income African American sample of 253 mother-child dyads. Anxiety during pregnancy was self-reported by the mother at intake and 36 weeks gestation. Neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes for children using maternal and teacher report (temperament, Child Behavior Checklist, Teacher-Child Rating Scale) and objective measures (Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children) were collected at 6 months, 2 and 6 years of age. Results: Prenatal anxiety significantly predicted a range of children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes from 6 months to 6 years. After controlling for maternal age, household income, percentage of poverty at intake, postnatal depression, and parenting, prenatal anxiety significantly predicted outcomes for both sexes. Significant effects were found on externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems at 2 years for boys; and for girls, on temperament at 6 months, externalizing problems at 2 years, externalizing and internalizing problems, school engagement, socio-emotional adjustment, and K-ABC at 6 years. The average effect was stronger for girls. Conclusions and Implications: Prenatal anxiety is related to children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes. The effects of prenatal anxiety on children's neurobehavioral and emotional problems differ by sex. Interventions targeted on reducing prenatal anxiety may be beneficial to children's cognitive, behavioral, and emotional development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrenatal Anxiety and ChildrenÆs Neurobehavioral and Emotional Problemsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Jui-Yingen_US
dc.contributor.authorKitzman, Harrieten_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorSidora-Arcoleo, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsJui Ying Feng, RN, DNS, PNP, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Rochester School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: juiying@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Harriet Kitzman, RN, PhD; Robert Cole, PhD; Kimberly Sidora-Arcoleo, MPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163519-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Animal studies suggest that prenatal anxiety or stress has a direct and/or indirect impact on behavioral and emotional problems of offspring. Most human studies of the impact of prenatal anxiety have been focused on Caucasian populations and used self-report measures for both predictor and outcome variables. The study purposes were to describe the relationship between prenatal anxiety and children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes over time, and to explore the sex differences in these effects on children's outcomes. Methods: Secondary data analyses from a longitudinal, randomized trial of nurse home visiting services were conducted using correlation and regression procedures. The analyses were conducted on a predominantly low-income African American sample of 253 mother-child dyads. Anxiety during pregnancy was self-reported by the mother at intake and 36 weeks gestation. Neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes for children using maternal and teacher report (temperament, Child Behavior Checklist, Teacher-Child Rating Scale) and objective measures (Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children) were collected at 6 months, 2 and 6 years of age. Results: Prenatal anxiety significantly predicted a range of children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes from 6 months to 6 years. After controlling for maternal age, household income, percentage of poverty at intake, postnatal depression, and parenting, prenatal anxiety significantly predicted outcomes for both sexes. Significant effects were found on externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems at 2 years for boys; and for girls, on temperament at 6 months, externalizing problems at 2 years, externalizing and internalizing problems, school engagement, socio-emotional adjustment, and K-ABC at 6 years. The average effect was stronger for girls. Conclusions and Implications: Prenatal anxiety is related to children's neurobehavioral and emotional outcomes. The effects of prenatal anxiety on children's neurobehavioral and emotional problems differ by sex. Interventions targeted on reducing prenatal anxiety may be beneficial to children's cognitive, behavioral, and emotional development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:58Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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