A Critical Examination of Advanced Practice NursesÆ Prescribing Practices For Patients With Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163521
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Critical Examination of Advanced Practice NursesÆ Prescribing Practices For Patients With Chronic Nonmalignant Pain
Author(s):
Fontana, Joyce
Author Details:
Joyce Fontana, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Saint Joseph College, Division of Nursing, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: jfontana@sjc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The importance of pain management for nursing cannot be overstated. Although this topic receives a great deal of attention, very little has been given to chronic nonmalignant pain and no previous research exists about advanced practice nurses (APRNs) treating this population. This study was undertaken to explore what cultural, political, social and personal factors influenced APRNs' prescribing decisions for this population. Methods: A critical methodology representing the synthesis of seven foundational processes consistently seen in critical research was used in this study. A sample of nine APRNs in diverse practice settings was interviewed. These interviews probed and challenged using dialogue to investigate and uncover hidden beliefs and attitudes of the participants. Influences on prescribing practices were identified and written in narrative form with supporting data given in the form of quotes. Results: Prescribing practices were found to be influenced by a lack of education in pain management, practice setting, personal and professional experiences related to pain and pain medication, fear of governmental oversight and the American anti-drug culture. These influences resulted in the presence of opiophobia among advanced practice nurses. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that APRNs are heavily influenced by factors that have nothing to do with the individual patient who has come to them for help. The political and social reality of advanced practice nursing was found to have situated providers in a context for practice that mandates concern for themselves and for society when prescribing opioids, sometimes at the expense of the patient. The study calls on APRNs to take the lead and show medical providers in general that pain management requires acts of moral courage to protect patients from sociopolitical forces that render their practice hostile to good patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Critical Examination of Advanced Practice NursesÆ Prescribing Practices For Patients With Chronic Nonmalignant Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFontana, Joyceen_US
dc.author.detailsJoyce Fontana, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Saint Joseph College, Division of Nursing, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: jfontana@sjc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163521-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The importance of pain management for nursing cannot be overstated. Although this topic receives a great deal of attention, very little has been given to chronic nonmalignant pain and no previous research exists about advanced practice nurses (APRNs) treating this population. This study was undertaken to explore what cultural, political, social and personal factors influenced APRNs' prescribing decisions for this population. Methods: A critical methodology representing the synthesis of seven foundational processes consistently seen in critical research was used in this study. A sample of nine APRNs in diverse practice settings was interviewed. These interviews probed and challenged using dialogue to investigate and uncover hidden beliefs and attitudes of the participants. Influences on prescribing practices were identified and written in narrative form with supporting data given in the form of quotes. Results: Prescribing practices were found to be influenced by a lack of education in pain management, practice setting, personal and professional experiences related to pain and pain medication, fear of governmental oversight and the American anti-drug culture. These influences resulted in the presence of opiophobia among advanced practice nurses. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that APRNs are heavily influenced by factors that have nothing to do with the individual patient who has come to them for help. The political and social reality of advanced practice nursing was found to have situated providers in a context for practice that mandates concern for themselves and for society when prescribing opioids, sometimes at the expense of the patient. The study calls on APRNs to take the lead and show medical providers in general that pain management requires acts of moral courage to protect patients from sociopolitical forces that render their practice hostile to good patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:00Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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