The Use of Common Physiologic Monitoring Parameters in the Identification of Critically Ill Patients at Risk for Sepsis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163523
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Common Physiologic Monitoring Parameters in the Identification of Critically Ill Patients at Risk for Sepsis
Author(s):
Giuliano, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Giuliano, RN, FAAN, Clinical Research Specialist, Boston College Connell School of Nursing, Salem, New Hampshire, USA, email: Karen.Giuliano@philips.com
Abstract:
Purpose: This study was conducted to assess the clinical relevance of the early physiologic screening criteria advocated by Early Goal-Directed Therapy for Sepsis, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines and the IHI Sepsis Bundle. Sepsis is a common source of morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients and targeting measures to promote early recognition and treatment of sepsis is at the forefront of many critical care initiatives. Methods: The Project IMPACT (PI) database was used to obtain a sample of patients (N=380) with an ICU admission diagnosis of sepsis and a random comparison sample of patients with an admission diagnosis (N=380) other than sepsis. The PI database is an international critical care database with approximately 140,000 patients to date. Results: Significant group differences were found on all physiologic monitoring variables tested (high temperature, p=.000, low temperature, p=001; heart rate, p=.004; respiratory rate, p=.005 and systolic blood pressure, p=.000). Logistic regression with all variables entered in 1 block explained 33.8% of the variance, indicated that the model was a fit and that group classification was correct 76.9% of the time. Conclusions and Implications: It is important to understand the value of common monitoring parameters in the early identification of sepsis, since those parameters are continuously monitored and readily available. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of bedside clinicians to assure that the parameters chosen for monitoring provide the most accurate reflection of the patient's clinical status. These results support the use of the currently recommended criteria for physiologic monitoring in the early identification of sepsis. The benefit of using a dataset like the PI dataset is that a large and diverse sample can be tested. However, it is important to remember that all secondary analyses have their limitations and thus, future research should include a replication of this study using a prospective sample.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Common Physiologic Monitoring Parameters in the Identification of Critically Ill Patients at Risk for Sepsisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGiuliano, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Giuliano, RN, FAAN, Clinical Research Specialist, Boston College Connell School of Nursing, Salem, New Hampshire, USA, email: Karen.Giuliano@philips.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163523-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study was conducted to assess the clinical relevance of the early physiologic screening criteria advocated by Early Goal-Directed Therapy for Sepsis, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines and the IHI Sepsis Bundle. Sepsis is a common source of morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients and targeting measures to promote early recognition and treatment of sepsis is at the forefront of many critical care initiatives. Methods: The Project IMPACT (PI) database was used to obtain a sample of patients (N=380) with an ICU admission diagnosis of sepsis and a random comparison sample of patients with an admission diagnosis (N=380) other than sepsis. The PI database is an international critical care database with approximately 140,000 patients to date. Results: Significant group differences were found on all physiologic monitoring variables tested (high temperature, p=.000, low temperature, p=001; heart rate, p=.004; respiratory rate, p=.005 and systolic blood pressure, p=.000). Logistic regression with all variables entered in 1 block explained 33.8% of the variance, indicated that the model was a fit and that group classification was correct 76.9% of the time. Conclusions and Implications: It is important to understand the value of common monitoring parameters in the early identification of sepsis, since those parameters are continuously monitored and readily available. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of bedside clinicians to assure that the parameters chosen for monitoring provide the most accurate reflection of the patient's clinical status. These results support the use of the currently recommended criteria for physiologic monitoring in the early identification of sepsis. The benefit of using a dataset like the PI dataset is that a large and diverse sample can be tested. However, it is important to remember that all secondary analyses have their limitations and thus, future research should include a replication of this study using a prospective sample.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:02Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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