2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163524
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Racial Disparities in Tumor Stage of Testicular Cancer
Author(s):
Gleason, Alexander
Author Details:
Alexander Gleason, RN, PhD, Clinical Instructor, Boston College, Affiliation Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: gleasoal@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Testicular cancer strikes over 7,000 men per year and is the most common cancer found in White males between the ages of 20-34 years of age in the United States. Men afflicted with this disease face the loss of one or more testicles, decreased ability to reproduce, and significant financial, emotional, and physical challenges from treatment. Currently, the literature does not report the increased hazards and risks of men from minority groups such as Hispanics and American Indians. This study explored the profile of five minority groups of males who were diagnosed with testicular cancer and the significant differences in tumor stage that existed among them within a proposed theoretical representation. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted on over 7,500 patients diagnosed with testicular cancer (ICD-O 62.X) as recorded in the National Cancer Institutes SEER database. All analyzed subjects were divided into one of five racial/ethnic groups (White, Black, Hispanic, Asian / Pacific Islander, or American Indian). The tumor size at diagnosis was used as the main outcome measure. An ANOVA was used to determine if significant differences existed among the five racial groups. Results: Tumor stage was classified as stage I-IV with a mean stage of 2.4. White males were diagnosed at the lowest stage (2.3) and American Indians at the highest stage (2.7). Significant differences in stage were seen between White and Black males (p=.038) and White and Hispanic males (p< .000). There were not sufficient numbers of American Indians to determine significance. Conclusions and Implications: Racial disparities elimination is dependant on the identification and resolution of significant factors affecting patient care. Nursing can research these variables to ensure all patient groups are treated equally without neglecting minority populations. Health education for males during their reproductive years needs to be prioritized by nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRacial Disparities in Tumor Stage of Testicular Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGleason, Alexanderen_US
dc.author.detailsAlexander Gleason, RN, PhD, Clinical Instructor, Boston College, Affiliation Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: gleasoal@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163524-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Testicular cancer strikes over 7,000 men per year and is the most common cancer found in White males between the ages of 20-34 years of age in the United States. Men afflicted with this disease face the loss of one or more testicles, decreased ability to reproduce, and significant financial, emotional, and physical challenges from treatment. Currently, the literature does not report the increased hazards and risks of men from minority groups such as Hispanics and American Indians. This study explored the profile of five minority groups of males who were diagnosed with testicular cancer and the significant differences in tumor stage that existed among them within a proposed theoretical representation. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted on over 7,500 patients diagnosed with testicular cancer (ICD-O 62.X) as recorded in the National Cancer Institutes SEER database. All analyzed subjects were divided into one of five racial/ethnic groups (White, Black, Hispanic, Asian / Pacific Islander, or American Indian). The tumor size at diagnosis was used as the main outcome measure. An ANOVA was used to determine if significant differences existed among the five racial groups. Results: Tumor stage was classified as stage I-IV with a mean stage of 2.4. White males were diagnosed at the lowest stage (2.3) and American Indians at the highest stage (2.7). Significant differences in stage were seen between White and Black males (p=.038) and White and Hispanic males (p< .000). There were not sufficient numbers of American Indians to determine significance. Conclusions and Implications: Racial disparities elimination is dependant on the identification and resolution of significant factors affecting patient care. Nursing can research these variables to ensure all patient groups are treated equally without neglecting minority populations. Health education for males during their reproductive years needs to be prioritized by nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:03Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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