The Influence of Maternal Postpartum Depression on Fathers and on Father-Infant Interaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163525
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Maternal Postpartum Depression on Fathers and on Father-Infant Interaction
Author(s):
Goodman, Janice
Author Details:
Janice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Maternal postpartum depression (PPD) has potential negative effects on a woman's partner and child. It has been shown to negatively influence mother-infant interaction; however, little research has explored how father-infant interaction is affected when a mother is depressed. This research explored the influence of maternal PPD on paternal depressive level, paternal parenting stress, and paternal marital satisfaction, and the influence of these factors on father-infant interaction. The influence of mother-infant interaction on father-infant interaction was also explored. Methods: Potential participants were recruited from the postpartum units of a large urban teaching hospital and 790 women were screened at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. The resultant sample included 128 couples, 60 which included a woman who scored within the depressed range on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Study couples completed depression scales, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index. Short Form at 2 to 3 months postpartum. Mother-infant and father-infant interaction were videotaped for scoring using the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression analyses, and MANOVA were conducted. Results: Partners of postpartum depressed women had significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and parenting stress than partners of non-depressed women, but did not differ significantly on marital satisfaction. MANOVA showed that maternal depression at both screening and at 2 to 3 months postpartum was correlated with significantly less optimal father-infant interaction. Father-infant interaction was not significantly associated with paternal marital satisfaction, paternal parenting stress, or mother-infant interaction. Conclusions and Implications: Maternal PPD has negative effects on fathers and on father-infant interaction. The results provide evidence that fathers do not provide a buffering effect when a mother is depressed, but instead suggest that maternal depression's negative effect on father-infant interaction may increase potential risk to child development. This study highlights the need for a family focused approach to assessment and treatment of PPD.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Maternal Postpartum Depression on Fathers and on Father-Infant Interactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Janiceen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163525-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Maternal postpartum depression (PPD) has potential negative effects on a woman's partner and child. It has been shown to negatively influence mother-infant interaction; however, little research has explored how father-infant interaction is affected when a mother is depressed. This research explored the influence of maternal PPD on paternal depressive level, paternal parenting stress, and paternal marital satisfaction, and the influence of these factors on father-infant interaction. The influence of mother-infant interaction on father-infant interaction was also explored. Methods: Potential participants were recruited from the postpartum units of a large urban teaching hospital and 790 women were screened at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. The resultant sample included 128 couples, 60 which included a woman who scored within the depressed range on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Study couples completed depression scales, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index. Short Form at 2 to 3 months postpartum. Mother-infant and father-infant interaction were videotaped for scoring using the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale. Descriptive statistics, multiple regression analyses, and MANOVA were conducted. Results: Partners of postpartum depressed women had significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and parenting stress than partners of non-depressed women, but did not differ significantly on marital satisfaction. MANOVA showed that maternal depression at both screening and at 2 to 3 months postpartum was correlated with significantly less optimal father-infant interaction. Father-infant interaction was not significantly associated with paternal marital satisfaction, paternal parenting stress, or mother-infant interaction. Conclusions and Implications: Maternal PPD has negative effects on fathers and on father-infant interaction. The results provide evidence that fathers do not provide a buffering effect when a mother is depressed, but instead suggest that maternal depression's negative effect on father-infant interaction may increase potential risk to child development. This study highlights the need for a family focused approach to assessment and treatment of PPD.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:04Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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