2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163527
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Weight Gain During Pregnancy and Long Term Body Mass Index Change
Author(s):
Groth, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Groth, PhD, RNC, NP, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Susan_groth@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Obesity is a major health problem for US women, contributing to multiple medical disorders, morbidity, and mortality. Adolescent overweight increases the risk of adult obesity. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) gestational weight gain recommendations propose that weight gain be based on pre-pregnant BMI. There is little research that has examined adolescent outcomes in relation to these recommendations. The aim of this study was to examine the weight changes of Black adolescents post delivery of a first child, in relation to the IOM recommendations and adult obesity. Methods: Retrospective, cohort study examined, longitudinally, the weight changes of 350 primiparous Black adolescents who delivered term infants, using data from a RCT of a home visitation intervention conducted in Memphis, TN. Adolescent weight gain was categorized based on pre-pregnant BMI using IOM recommendations. Outcomes were BMI at 6 and 9 years post childbirth, and neonatal birth weight. Data were analyzed using descriptive methods and linear regression. Results: The adolescents gained below (34.5%), within (30.5%), and above (35%) the recommendations. There was a significant BMI increase at 6 and 9 years from pre-pregnant BMI (p < .001). Gestational weight gain, after allowing for anticipated growth, was a significant predictor of BMI change (p < .001). Weight gain above the recommendations resulted in greater risk for overweight/obesity. Adolescents who gained below, within, or above the recommendations had equal numbers of neonates that weighed < 2500 gm. Conclusions and Implications: Primiparous Black adolescents who gained above the IOM recommendations were at greater risk for overweight/obesity in adulthood. Encouraging recommended gestational weight gain could reduce development of obesity. Most adolescents delivered infants that weighed between 2500 and 4000 gm, irrespective of the amount of weight gained, indicating a need for further study of the impact of gestational weight gain on neonatal outcome.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Weight Gain During Pregnancy and Long Term Body Mass Index Changeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGroth, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Groth, PhD, RNC, NP, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Susan_groth@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163527-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Obesity is a major health problem for US women, contributing to multiple medical disorders, morbidity, and mortality. Adolescent overweight increases the risk of adult obesity. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) gestational weight gain recommendations propose that weight gain be based on pre-pregnant BMI. There is little research that has examined adolescent outcomes in relation to these recommendations. The aim of this study was to examine the weight changes of Black adolescents post delivery of a first child, in relation to the IOM recommendations and adult obesity. Methods: Retrospective, cohort study examined, longitudinally, the weight changes of 350 primiparous Black adolescents who delivered term infants, using data from a RCT of a home visitation intervention conducted in Memphis, TN. Adolescent weight gain was categorized based on pre-pregnant BMI using IOM recommendations. Outcomes were BMI at 6 and 9 years post childbirth, and neonatal birth weight. Data were analyzed using descriptive methods and linear regression. Results: The adolescents gained below (34.5%), within (30.5%), and above (35%) the recommendations. There was a significant BMI increase at 6 and 9 years from pre-pregnant BMI (p < .001). Gestational weight gain, after allowing for anticipated growth, was a significant predictor of BMI change (p < .001). Weight gain above the recommendations resulted in greater risk for overweight/obesity. Adolescents who gained below, within, or above the recommendations had equal numbers of neonates that weighed < 2500 gm. Conclusions and Implications: Primiparous Black adolescents who gained above the IOM recommendations were at greater risk for overweight/obesity in adulthood. Encouraging recommended gestational weight gain could reduce development of obesity. Most adolescents delivered infants that weighed between 2500 and 4000 gm, irrespective of the amount of weight gained, indicating a need for further study of the impact of gestational weight gain on neonatal outcome.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:07Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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