2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163528
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Family Partnership: Are more partners needed?
Author(s):
Hanks, Carole; Kitzman, Harriet
Author Details:
Carole Hanks, DrPH, RN, Research Fellow, University of Rochester SON, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Carole_Hanks@urmc.rochester.edu; Harriet Kitzman, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) has grown from one trial program in Elmira, New York in the 1970's to a nationwide system of programs linking nurses with families raising children at-risk for poor developmental and health outcomes. The focus of the intervention has been the family û supporting the mother in her own goals, strengthening parenting knowledge and skills, and using referrals and other strategies to increase family options and resources. In view of the many neighborhood effects on children now described in the literature on child health and development, this study aims to describe patterns of residential moves in a sample of poor, child-rearing families. The study also aims to address neighborhood effects on children's health and development over and above family effects, Methods: Data from surveys, observational tools, school records, and standardized developmental assessments were gathered in a randomized, clinical trial and follow-up evaluation in Memphis TN, from 1990 to the present. Participants' residential addresses across time were linked to U.S. census and local crime data to construct neighborhood descriptive variables. We conducted ordinary least squares, and multi-level regression analyses of neighborhood-, family-, and child-level data over the first 9 years of the study children's lives. Preliminary analyses found that poor, lower risk nurse-visited families moved to better neighborhoods than poor, higher risk, nurse-visited or poor, usual-care families. The patterns of moves as well as the effects of neighborhood context on selected children's outcomes suggest that the neighborhood context has an important effect on children's health and developmental outcomes over and above that of the family. Conclusion: These analyses set the stage for a policy discussion of the need for NFP nurses to go beyond partnerships with families to create partnerships with federal and municipal agencies capable of improving the safety and quality of neighborhoods.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Family Partnership: Are more partners needed?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHanks, Caroleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKitzman, Harrieten_US
dc.author.detailsCarole Hanks, DrPH, RN, Research Fellow, University of Rochester SON, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Carole_Hanks@urmc.rochester.edu; Harriet Kitzman, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163528-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) has grown from one trial program in Elmira, New York in the 1970's to a nationwide system of programs linking nurses with families raising children at-risk for poor developmental and health outcomes. The focus of the intervention has been the family û supporting the mother in her own goals, strengthening parenting knowledge and skills, and using referrals and other strategies to increase family options and resources. In view of the many neighborhood effects on children now described in the literature on child health and development, this study aims to describe patterns of residential moves in a sample of poor, child-rearing families. The study also aims to address neighborhood effects on children's health and development over and above family effects, Methods: Data from surveys, observational tools, school records, and standardized developmental assessments were gathered in a randomized, clinical trial and follow-up evaluation in Memphis TN, from 1990 to the present. Participants' residential addresses across time were linked to U.S. census and local crime data to construct neighborhood descriptive variables. We conducted ordinary least squares, and multi-level regression analyses of neighborhood-, family-, and child-level data over the first 9 years of the study children's lives. Preliminary analyses found that poor, lower risk nurse-visited families moved to better neighborhoods than poor, higher risk, nurse-visited or poor, usual-care families. The patterns of moves as well as the effects of neighborhood context on selected children's outcomes suggest that the neighborhood context has an important effect on children's health and developmental outcomes over and above that of the family. Conclusion: These analyses set the stage for a policy discussion of the need for NFP nurses to go beyond partnerships with families to create partnerships with federal and municipal agencies capable of improving the safety and quality of neighborhoods.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:08Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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