Depressive Symptomatology and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Lipid Research Clinics Follow-Up Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163529
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressive Symptomatology and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Lipid Research Clinics Follow-Up Study
Author(s):
Hayman, Laura; An, Ji-Young; Napolitano, Joseph; Morrison, John A.; Friedman, Lisa A.
Author Details:
Laura Hayman, PhD, FAAN, Professor, Division of Nursing, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: laura.hayman@nyu.edu; Ji-Young An, BN, MPH; Joseph Napolitano, MSN, MPH; John A. Morrison, PhD; Lisa A Friedman, ScM
Abstract:
Purpose: Epidemiologic and clinical studies demonstrate associations between depressive symptomatology (DS), excess risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and adverse outcomes following coronary events. The relationship of potentially modifiable CVD risk factors and DS in individuals without documented CVD remains to be clarified. The purpose of this population-based observational study was to examine DS-CVD risk factor associations in Black (n=318; 65% female) and White (n=872; 53% female) participants (30-80 years of age; M=49.5 years; SD= 12.1) without documented CVD from the Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) Follow-Up Study. Methods: DS was measured by self-report with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Standardized protocols used in the original LRC for measurement of modifiable risk factors were adapted for the Follow-Up Study. Smoking behavior was measured by self-report and obesity by body-mass index (BMI: kg/m2). Fasting plasma specimens were used to determine total cholesterol (TC) and cardioprotective high- density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Descriptive statistics, Chi-square and pooled t-tests were conducted. Results: Pooled t-tests were used to compare mean risk factor levels of participants in the top (n=243; 64% female) vs. bottom (n=256; 50% female) quintile of the BDI- II distribution. Participants in the top BDI-II quintile had higher (p< .05) TC levels (221.6 mg/dl vs. 201.5 mg/dl), BMI (30.0 vs. 28.3), and lower HDL-C (44.0 mg/dl vs. 46.3 mg/dl). The percentage of current smokers in the top (31%) vs. bottom (17.5 %) BDI-II quintile also differed significantly. Conclusions and Implications: DS associates with modifiable CVD risk factors in black and white men and women without CVD. Inclusion of DS as part of global risk assessment for primary prevention of CVD is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Sponsors:
This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH, R01 HL 62394.
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressive Symptomatology and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Lipid Research Clinics Follow-Up Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHayman, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorAn, Ji-Youngen_US
dc.contributor.authorNapolitano, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, Lisa A.en_US
dc.author.detailsLaura Hayman, PhD, FAAN, Professor, Division of Nursing, The Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: laura.hayman@nyu.edu; Ji-Young An, BN, MPH; Joseph Napolitano, MSN, MPH; John A. Morrison, PhD; Lisa A Friedman, ScMen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163529-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Epidemiologic and clinical studies demonstrate associations between depressive symptomatology (DS), excess risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and adverse outcomes following coronary events. The relationship of potentially modifiable CVD risk factors and DS in individuals without documented CVD remains to be clarified. The purpose of this population-based observational study was to examine DS-CVD risk factor associations in Black (n=318; 65% female) and White (n=872; 53% female) participants (30-80 years of age; M=49.5 years; SD= 12.1) without documented CVD from the Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) Follow-Up Study. Methods: DS was measured by self-report with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Standardized protocols used in the original LRC for measurement of modifiable risk factors were adapted for the Follow-Up Study. Smoking behavior was measured by self-report and obesity by body-mass index (BMI: kg/m2). Fasting plasma specimens were used to determine total cholesterol (TC) and cardioprotective high- density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Descriptive statistics, Chi-square and pooled t-tests were conducted. Results: Pooled t-tests were used to compare mean risk factor levels of participants in the top (n=243; 64% female) vs. bottom (n=256; 50% female) quintile of the BDI- II distribution. Participants in the top BDI-II quintile had higher (p< .05) TC levels (221.6 mg/dl vs. 201.5 mg/dl), BMI (30.0 vs. 28.3), and lower HDL-C (44.0 mg/dl vs. 46.3 mg/dl). The percentage of current smokers in the top (31%) vs. bottom (17.5 %) BDI-II quintile also differed significantly. Conclusions and Implications: DS associates with modifiable CVD risk factors in black and white men and women without CVD. Inclusion of DS as part of global risk assessment for primary prevention of CVD is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:09Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH, R01 HL 62394.en_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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