2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163530
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life in Persons with HIV and Liver Disease
Author(s):
Henderson, Wendy; Caruthers, Donna; Erlen, Judith A.
Author Details:
Wendy Henderson, PhD, MSN, CRNP, Scientist, NINR Intramural Research Division, Symptom Management Branch, Biobehavioral Unit, Bethesda, Maryland, United States, email: hendersw@mail.nih.gov; Donna Caruthers, RN; Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Clinical evidence suggests that patients with liver disease and HIV have poorer quality of life (QoL). Because little research exists to support this observation, this study examined the relationships between people with HIV and liver disorders and their quality of life. Methods: Cella's multidimensional conceptualization of QoL (functional, social, emotional, physical) guided this study. Measures to assess this included MOS-HIV role function subscale (MOSRF; functional), Inventory for Interpersonal Support (ISEL; social), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; emotional), and Symptom Distress Scale (SDS; physical). Overall QoL was measured by the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI). This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the parent study (RO1 NR04749). Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, and linear regression. Results: The sample included 80 participants, 70% male, 63.8% Caucasian, with liver disorders and HIV; 48.8% had chronic or permanent hepatitis. The average age was 40.95 + 7.03 years, and the average years of education was 13.01+2.767. Cella's four dimensions significantly correlated with QoL (QLI): functional (MOSRF), r=.329, p< .01; social (ISEL), r=.636, p< .01; emotional (BDI), r=-.549, p< .01; and physical (SDS), r=-.480, p< .01. Linear regression analysis with QoL as the dependent variable and the four dimensions as predictors resulted in significant associations with emotional, social, and physical dimensions explaining approximately 50% of the variance (R2=.532). Conclusions and Implications: Interestingly, role function did not act as a predictor of overall QoL. Possibly, these individuals do not see themselves as having a social working role or there may be an interactional effect of being unemployed, as over 70% were unemployed or disabled. Future research is needed with a larger sample and potentially a different measure of role function. Understanding the multiple dimensions of QoL may assist in developing interventions for patients with HIV and comorbid liver disorders.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life in Persons with HIV and Liver Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaruthers, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorErlen, Judith A.en_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Henderson, PhD, MSN, CRNP, Scientist, NINR Intramural Research Division, Symptom Management Branch, Biobehavioral Unit, Bethesda, Maryland, United States, email: hendersw@mail.nih.gov; Donna Caruthers, RN; Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163530-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Clinical evidence suggests that patients with liver disease and HIV have poorer quality of life (QoL). Because little research exists to support this observation, this study examined the relationships between people with HIV and liver disorders and their quality of life. Methods: Cella's multidimensional conceptualization of QoL (functional, social, emotional, physical) guided this study. Measures to assess this included MOS-HIV role function subscale (MOSRF; functional), Inventory for Interpersonal Support (ISEL; social), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; emotional), and Symptom Distress Scale (SDS; physical). Overall QoL was measured by the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI). This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the parent study (RO1 NR04749). Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, and linear regression. Results: The sample included 80 participants, 70% male, 63.8% Caucasian, with liver disorders and HIV; 48.8% had chronic or permanent hepatitis. The average age was 40.95 + 7.03 years, and the average years of education was 13.01+2.767. Cella's four dimensions significantly correlated with QoL (QLI): functional (MOSRF), r=.329, p< .01; social (ISEL), r=.636, p< .01; emotional (BDI), r=-.549, p< .01; and physical (SDS), r=-.480, p< .01. Linear regression analysis with QoL as the dependent variable and the four dimensions as predictors resulted in significant associations with emotional, social, and physical dimensions explaining approximately 50% of the variance (R2=.532). Conclusions and Implications: Interestingly, role function did not act as a predictor of overall QoL. Possibly, these individuals do not see themselves as having a social working role or there may be an interactional effect of being unemployed, as over 70% were unemployed or disabled. Future research is needed with a larger sample and potentially a different measure of role function. Understanding the multiple dimensions of QoL may assist in developing interventions for patients with HIV and comorbid liver disorders.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:10Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.