2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163531
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Insurance on Breast Cancer Screening Activities
Author(s):
Ho-Shing, Donna
Author Details:
Donna M. Ho-Shing, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., C.N.L., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Associate Chair Undergraduate Department, Seton Hall University College of Nursing, South Orange, New Jersey, USA, email: donna.ho-shing@shu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Although breast cancer is the second among all malignancies to cause deaths in women, a large proportion of women remain inadequately screened for this deadly disease. Conventional theories postulate that low-income and uninsured women are less likely to receive mammographies, clinical breast examinations (CBE), and to engage in self-breast examinations (BSE). However, there has been little research that has explored differential levels of both BSE and provider-directed breast cancer screening activities among women without insurance, with Medicaid, and with private insurance. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted with data collected in 1994 and 1995 for the Alameda County Health and Ways of Living Study. This dataset includes responses related to key study variables, including frequencies of BSE, clinical breast examination, and mammography, elicited from a large, stratified random sample of women. The sample (n = 936) for the current study was delimited to women less than 65 years of age. Data were subjected to analysis of variance. Results: There were no significant differences among women without insurance, with Medicaid, and private insurance regarding the frequency of BSE, F(2, 609) = .33, p = .72. Uninsured women did, however, receive significantly less provider-directed screening activities including fewer CBEs, F(2,852) = 5.18, p = .01, and mammograms F(2,927) = 14.96, p = .00. Conclusions and Implications: Contrary to conventional literature, these findings indicate that similarly to insured women, uninsured women will engage in breast cancer screening activities, such as BSE, over which they have personal control. Findings support, however, disparities in their access to provider-directed screenings. Among uninsured women, BSE remains a crucial and frequently singular activity in the early detection of breast cancer. Nursing has an important role in supporting and encouraging BSE, especially among uninsured women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Insurance on Breast Cancer Screening Activitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHo-Shing, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna M. Ho-Shing, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., C.N.L., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Associate Chair Undergraduate Department, Seton Hall University College of Nursing, South Orange, New Jersey, USA, email: donna.ho-shing@shu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163531-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although breast cancer is the second among all malignancies to cause deaths in women, a large proportion of women remain inadequately screened for this deadly disease. Conventional theories postulate that low-income and uninsured women are less likely to receive mammographies, clinical breast examinations (CBE), and to engage in self-breast examinations (BSE). However, there has been little research that has explored differential levels of both BSE and provider-directed breast cancer screening activities among women without insurance, with Medicaid, and with private insurance. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted with data collected in 1994 and 1995 for the Alameda County Health and Ways of Living Study. This dataset includes responses related to key study variables, including frequencies of BSE, clinical breast examination, and mammography, elicited from a large, stratified random sample of women. The sample (n = 936) for the current study was delimited to women less than 65 years of age. Data were subjected to analysis of variance. Results: There were no significant differences among women without insurance, with Medicaid, and private insurance regarding the frequency of BSE, F(2, 609) = .33, p = .72. Uninsured women did, however, receive significantly less provider-directed screening activities including fewer CBEs, F(2,852) = 5.18, p = .01, and mammograms F(2,927) = 14.96, p = .00. Conclusions and Implications: Contrary to conventional literature, these findings indicate that similarly to insured women, uninsured women will engage in breast cancer screening activities, such as BSE, over which they have personal control. Findings support, however, disparities in their access to provider-directed screenings. Among uninsured women, BSE remains a crucial and frequently singular activity in the early detection of breast cancer. Nursing has an important role in supporting and encouraging BSE, especially among uninsured women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:10Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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