Dignity is Like the Air: Family Members, Dignity, and Relationships in the Intensive Care Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163534
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dignity is Like the Air: Family Members, Dignity, and Relationships in the Intensive Care Unit
Author(s):
Jacelon, Cynthia; Cobert, Allison; Logan, Bridget; Michonski, Joanne; Henneman, Elizabeth A.
Author Details:
Cynthia Jacelon, PhD RN CRRN-A, Post Doctoral Fellow, Yale School of Nursing, Center for Self and Family Management of Chronic Illness, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Allison Colbert, MS RN; Bridget Logan, BS RN; Joanne Michonski, RN BS; Elizabeth A. Henneman, PhD RN
Abstract:
Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and relative importance that family members of elderly patients in an intensive care unit ascribed to dignity. Dignity is not explicitly identified as a need in the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (Leske, 1992) but was thought to be of importance based on the authors' earlier work. Methods Case method using a multiple case design was employed. The theoretical framework was Symbolic Interactionism. Data consisted of unstructured, audio taped interviews of volunteer individual, English speaking family members, while their elderly relative was a patient. They were conducted in a private setting within the hospital. A descriptive approach using the constant comparative method was employed to identify themes across cases. Results Issues of dignity were pervasive, like the air. Participants' focused on their relationships with the patient, staff, and other family members. Dignity was not mentioned as long as it was not threatened. Concern for both the patient's dignity and the dignity of the family itself was implicit in their comments. Issues of the patient's dignity arose when the family was called to give voice to the patient's wishes or make decisions regarding additional patient interventions. Dignity of the family members was evident in their comments regarding positive and negative interactions with staff and family members' ability to advocate for their loved one. Conclusions and Implications Both the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the American Nurses Association (ANA) identify dignity as an essential component of nursing. Critical care is a setting where dignity oftentimes seems lost among other priorities of care. Nurses and other staff can better attend to holistic needs of the family-centered care that the American Association of Critical Care Nurses identifies as a high priority, by treating both family members and patients with dignity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDignity is Like the Air: Family Members, Dignity, and Relationships in the Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorJacelon, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCobert, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bridgeten_US
dc.contributor.authorMichonski, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHenneman, Elizabeth A.en_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Jacelon, PhD RN CRRN-A, Post Doctoral Fellow, Yale School of Nursing, Center for Self and Family Management of Chronic Illness, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: jacelon@nursing.umass.edu; Allison Colbert, MS RN; Bridget Logan, BS RN; Joanne Michonski, RN BS; Elizabeth A. Henneman, PhD RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163534-
dc.description.abstractPurpose The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and relative importance that family members of elderly patients in an intensive care unit ascribed to dignity. Dignity is not explicitly identified as a need in the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (Leske, 1992) but was thought to be of importance based on the authors' earlier work. Methods Case method using a multiple case design was employed. The theoretical framework was Symbolic Interactionism. Data consisted of unstructured, audio taped interviews of volunteer individual, English speaking family members, while their elderly relative was a patient. They were conducted in a private setting within the hospital. A descriptive approach using the constant comparative method was employed to identify themes across cases. Results Issues of dignity were pervasive, like the air. Participants' focused on their relationships with the patient, staff, and other family members. Dignity was not mentioned as long as it was not threatened. Concern for both the patient's dignity and the dignity of the family itself was implicit in their comments. Issues of the patient's dignity arose when the family was called to give voice to the patient's wishes or make decisions regarding additional patient interventions. Dignity of the family members was evident in their comments regarding positive and negative interactions with staff and family members' ability to advocate for their loved one. Conclusions and Implications Both the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the American Nurses Association (ANA) identify dignity as an essential component of nursing. Critical care is a setting where dignity oftentimes seems lost among other priorities of care. Nurses and other staff can better attend to holistic needs of the family-centered care that the American Association of Critical Care Nurses identifies as a high priority, by treating both family members and patients with dignity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:13Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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