Informatics Competencies for Nurse Practitioner Students Pre- and Post-Implementation of a Palm-based Clinical Log and Informatics for Evidence-Based Practice Curriculum

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163535
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Informatics Competencies for Nurse Practitioner Students Pre- and Post-Implementation of a Palm-based Clinical Log and Informatics for Evidence-Based Practice Curriculum
Author(s):
Jenkins, Melinda; Desjardins, Karen; John, Ritamarie; Roberts, W. Dan; Choi, Jeungok; Bakken, Suzanne
Author Details:
Melinda Jenkins, PhD, FNP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: mlj2101@columbia.edu; Karen Desjardins, MS, MPH, ANP, GNP; Ritamarie John, MSN, PNP; W. Dan Roberts, MSN, ANP; Jeungok Choi, PhD, RN; Suzanne Bakken, DNSc, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the informatics competencies of students entering nurse practitioner (NP) programs at Columbia University in 2003. The students' competencies will be measured again after completion of the curriculum in which informatics content is integrated and handheld computers are used to document patient encounters. BSN students at the school have previously shown significant increases in all competency areas from admission to graduation. Methods: Students self-reported informatics competencies before enrollment in NP clinical courses in pediatrics, family practice, adult, women's health, and gerontology. Informatics competencies were rated from 1 (not competent) to 5 (expert) in a survey based on published research. Results: The majority (64%) was age 20-29, 20% were age 30-39, 89% were female, and 80% used a computer at least once a day. The most frequently used computer applications were: e-mail (99%), Internet (92%), word processing (82%), electronic calendar (33%), and spreadsheet (30%). In competency areas, items clustered in groups of 1-8 items, a minimum mean score of 3.0 was considered competent. Competencies were found for computer skills in communication and systems. When students entering for ANP, GNP, and WHNP programs were grouped grouped (due to overlapping coursework in these programs), their competencies were found to be similar to those entering for FNP and PNP programs, except for basic desktop software computer skills (p=.021), and clinical informatics skills (p=.008). Conclusions and Implications: Students entering NP programs began with competencies in two computer skills areas but had none in informatics knowledge and none in informatics skills. To meet the recommended competencies for practice, informatics content appears to be needed in the NP curriculum. Re-assessment near graduation will evaluate the extent to which the NP informatics curriculum results in informatics competent graduates who are prepared to work within the evolving national information infrastructure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformatics Competencies for Nurse Practitioner Students Pre- and Post-Implementation of a Palm-based Clinical Log and Informatics for Evidence-Based Practice Curriculumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Melindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDesjardins, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohn, Ritamarieen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, W. Danen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Jeungoken_US
dc.contributor.authorBakken, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsMelinda Jenkins, PhD, FNP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: mlj2101@columbia.edu; Karen Desjardins, MS, MPH, ANP, GNP; Ritamarie John, MSN, PNP; W. Dan Roberts, MSN, ANP; Jeungok Choi, PhD, RN; Suzanne Bakken, DNSc, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163535-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the informatics competencies of students entering nurse practitioner (NP) programs at Columbia University in 2003. The students' competencies will be measured again after completion of the curriculum in which informatics content is integrated and handheld computers are used to document patient encounters. BSN students at the school have previously shown significant increases in all competency areas from admission to graduation. Methods: Students self-reported informatics competencies before enrollment in NP clinical courses in pediatrics, family practice, adult, women's health, and gerontology. Informatics competencies were rated from 1 (not competent) to 5 (expert) in a survey based on published research. Results: The majority (64%) was age 20-29, 20% were age 30-39, 89% were female, and 80% used a computer at least once a day. The most frequently used computer applications were: e-mail (99%), Internet (92%), word processing (82%), electronic calendar (33%), and spreadsheet (30%). In competency areas, items clustered in groups of 1-8 items, a minimum mean score of 3.0 was considered competent. Competencies were found for computer skills in communication and systems. When students entering for ANP, GNP, and WHNP programs were grouped grouped (due to overlapping coursework in these programs), their competencies were found to be similar to those entering for FNP and PNP programs, except for basic desktop software computer skills (p=.021), and clinical informatics skills (p=.008). Conclusions and Implications: Students entering NP programs began with competencies in two computer skills areas but had none in informatics knowledge and none in informatics skills. To meet the recommended competencies for practice, informatics content appears to be needed in the NP curriculum. Re-assessment near graduation will evaluate the extent to which the NP informatics curriculum results in informatics competent graduates who are prepared to work within the evolving national information infrastructure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:15Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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