2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163536
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influences on Postpartum Weight Retention: Pilot Study
Author(s):
Kearney, Margaret; Simonelli, M. Colleen
Author Details:
Margaret Kearney, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Associate Editor JOGNN, Independence Foundation Professor, Professor PhD and MS/PhD Programs, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: margaret_kearney@urmc.rochester.edu; M. Colleen Simonelli, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Purpose: Retention of pregnancy weight gain contributes to lifelong obesity in women. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and effect on postpartum weight retention of a nursing intervention using motivational interviewing. Methods: Women who had gained over 35 pounds in pregnancy, did not have chronic illness affecting diet or exercise, and had delivered healthy singletons (n=21) were randomized to treatment or support-only groups and followed with home visits and phone calls from 2-8 months postpartum. The sample consisted of 17 European-American, 2 Hispanic, and 2 African American women. The intervention group received a structured motivational interviewing intervention at each monthly contact. All participants received support and basic nutrition and exercise information. Data were analyzed using visual comparisons and nonparametric statistics. Results: The protocol was feasible and well accepted by participants, but the intervention did not produce a difference in weight, BMI, or weight retained by the 8-month study endpoint. Education and income level were not related to weight retained at 8 months postpartum. Single minority women retained an average of 31 pounds at 8 months, compared to 16 pounds in married European-American women. Women with higher pregnancy weight gain or pre-pregnant BMI or who worked > 10 hours/ week retained more weight. Exercising > 1 day/week appeared to reduce weight retention. Conclusions and Implications: The intervention may need to start sooner and involve more frequent contacts to achieve an effect on weight retention, but its feasibility and acceptability are promising for use in a larger study. In the mean time, clinicians should provide support and monitoring of weight gain throughout pregnancy, particularly to single minority women and those with high pre-pregnant BMI. Women who return to work early may need individualized support to make time for exercise and healthy eating behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Sponsors:
This study was supported by a Research Incentive grant from Boston College.
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluences on Postpartum Weight Retention: Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorSimonelli, M. Colleenen_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Kearney, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Associate Editor JOGNN, Independence Foundation Professor, Professor PhD and MS/PhD Programs, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: margaret_kearney@urmc.rochester.edu; M. Colleen Simonelli, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163536-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Retention of pregnancy weight gain contributes to lifelong obesity in women. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and effect on postpartum weight retention of a nursing intervention using motivational interviewing. Methods: Women who had gained over 35 pounds in pregnancy, did not have chronic illness affecting diet or exercise, and had delivered healthy singletons (n=21) were randomized to treatment or support-only groups and followed with home visits and phone calls from 2-8 months postpartum. The sample consisted of 17 European-American, 2 Hispanic, and 2 African American women. The intervention group received a structured motivational interviewing intervention at each monthly contact. All participants received support and basic nutrition and exercise information. Data were analyzed using visual comparisons and nonparametric statistics. Results: The protocol was feasible and well accepted by participants, but the intervention did not produce a difference in weight, BMI, or weight retained by the 8-month study endpoint. Education and income level were not related to weight retained at 8 months postpartum. Single minority women retained an average of 31 pounds at 8 months, compared to 16 pounds in married European-American women. Women with higher pregnancy weight gain or pre-pregnant BMI or who worked > 10 hours/ week retained more weight. Exercising > 1 day/week appeared to reduce weight retention. Conclusions and Implications: The intervention may need to start sooner and involve more frequent contacts to achieve an effect on weight retention, but its feasibility and acceptability are promising for use in a larger study. In the mean time, clinicians should provide support and monitoring of weight gain throughout pregnancy, particularly to single minority women and those with high pre-pregnant BMI. Women who return to work early may need individualized support to make time for exercise and healthy eating behaviors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:16Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by a Research Incentive grant from Boston College.en_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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