2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163537
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of symptom distress in elderly women with breast cancer
Author(s):
Kenefick, Amy
Author Details:
Amy Kenefick, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: amy.kenefick@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of subjective symptom distress over time in elderly women receiving surgical treatment for breast cancer and to examine the relationship of selected patient and clinical characteristics to symptom distress. Methods. Subjects were from a large mid-Atlantic teaching hospital, 60 years or older, with definitive primary surgical treatment of breast cancer, a prognosis of greater than six months, discharged from the hospital with a physician's order for follow up care related to one or more high technology, complex procedures or treatment. Data were collected on discharge from the hospital and at 3 and 6 months later. Symptoms measured were frequency and severity of nausea, appetite, insomnia, frequency and severity of pain, fatigue, bowel pattern, concentration, appearance, breathing, outlook, and cough. Results. The most commonly occurring symptoms at each of the three points in time were fatigue, outlook and frequency of pain. Fatigue was consistently the most severe symptom, followed by pain frequency, then outlook. Subjects with nausea were likely to experience distress related to appetite, insomnia, fatigue, bowel pattern and outlook. Frequency and severity of pain correlated strongly, as did pain and fatigue, and fatigue with concentration and outlook. At the time of hospital discharge distress related to appearance and outlook was associated with distress due to concentration. Intensity of distress was independent of age, length of stay, number of comorbidities, religion, marital status and income. Conclusions and Implications for advancing the nursing research agenda or improving quality of care. Fatigue, outlook and frequency of pain remained important contributors to total symptom distress throughout the six months, independent of demographic variables, comorbidity, and length of hospitalization. Future research areas include the meaning of symptoms to patient, effect of symptom distress on functional status, and the effect of targeted interventions on individual symptoms and groups of symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of symptom distress in elderly women with breast canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorKenefick, Amyen_US
dc.author.detailsAmy Kenefick, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: amy.kenefick@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163537-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of subjective symptom distress over time in elderly women receiving surgical treatment for breast cancer and to examine the relationship of selected patient and clinical characteristics to symptom distress. Methods. Subjects were from a large mid-Atlantic teaching hospital, 60 years or older, with definitive primary surgical treatment of breast cancer, a prognosis of greater than six months, discharged from the hospital with a physician's order for follow up care related to one or more high technology, complex procedures or treatment. Data were collected on discharge from the hospital and at 3 and 6 months later. Symptoms measured were frequency and severity of nausea, appetite, insomnia, frequency and severity of pain, fatigue, bowel pattern, concentration, appearance, breathing, outlook, and cough. Results. The most commonly occurring symptoms at each of the three points in time were fatigue, outlook and frequency of pain. Fatigue was consistently the most severe symptom, followed by pain frequency, then outlook. Subjects with nausea were likely to experience distress related to appetite, insomnia, fatigue, bowel pattern and outlook. Frequency and severity of pain correlated strongly, as did pain and fatigue, and fatigue with concentration and outlook. At the time of hospital discharge distress related to appearance and outlook was associated with distress due to concentration. Intensity of distress was independent of age, length of stay, number of comorbidities, religion, marital status and income. Conclusions and Implications for advancing the nursing research agenda or improving quality of care. Fatigue, outlook and frequency of pain remained important contributors to total symptom distress throughout the six months, independent of demographic variables, comorbidity, and length of hospitalization. Future research areas include the meaning of symptoms to patient, effect of symptom distress on functional status, and the effect of targeted interventions on individual symptoms and groups of symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:17Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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