Korean American MenÆs Experiences of Smoking and Smoking Cessation: Social, Cultural, and Personal Factors Influencing the Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163538
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Korean American MenÆs Experiences of Smoking and Smoking Cessation: Social, Cultural, and Personal Factors Influencing the Behaviors
Author(s):
Kim, Sun; Son, Hae-In; Nam, Kyung A.
Author Details:
Sun Kim, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, UMDNJ-School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: Kimsu2@umdnj.edu; Hae-In Son, SW, CSW; Kyung A Nam, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Tobacco use is the single leading preventable cause of death in the US. The prevalence rate of smoking for Korean American men is reportedly among the highest. Nevertheless, there is little research on factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior. Specific aims of the study were to: (a) explore beliefs and attitudes toward smoking and smoking cessation and (b) identify factors associated with smoking and smoking cessation. Methods: Korean male immigrants (11 current and 11 former smokers) residing in New York City participated in one of four focus group interviews and each interview lasted for 90-120 minutes. Participants were asked to talk about their experiences in the following five topics: (a) smoking initiation, (b) maintenance of smoking behavior, (c) change in smoking behavior, (d) smoking cessation, and (e) suggestions for cessation intervention strategies. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim were analyzed for thematic contents. Five themes emerged as the major factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior and they were culture, gender, addiction, health, and age. The first two themes were created as socio-cultural factors and the remaining three as personal factors. Results: In the Korean cultural context, smoking is a common thread in men's social world and a prime component of men's gender identity. Degree of addiction, health status, and age are the personal factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior. Those who are older and see smoking as health risky behavior rather than socially sanctioned behavior perceive greater health risks of smoking, and more likely to quit or attempt to quit smoking. Conclusions and Implications: There is an urgent need for a smoking cessation program tailored to the specific needs of Korean American men. To do this effectively, health care workers must understand the role of the social, cultural, and personal factors influencing smoking behavior in this group.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKorean American MenÆs Experiences of Smoking and Smoking Cessation: Social, Cultural, and Personal Factors Influencing the Behaviorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sunen_US
dc.contributor.authorSon, Hae-Inen_US
dc.contributor.authorNam, Kyung A.en_US
dc.author.detailsSun Kim, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, UMDNJ-School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: Kimsu2@umdnj.edu; Hae-In Son, SW, CSW; Kyung A Nam, RN, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163538-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Tobacco use is the single leading preventable cause of death in the US. The prevalence rate of smoking for Korean American men is reportedly among the highest. Nevertheless, there is little research on factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior. Specific aims of the study were to: (a) explore beliefs and attitudes toward smoking and smoking cessation and (b) identify factors associated with smoking and smoking cessation. Methods: Korean male immigrants (11 current and 11 former smokers) residing in New York City participated in one of four focus group interviews and each interview lasted for 90-120 minutes. Participants were asked to talk about their experiences in the following five topics: (a) smoking initiation, (b) maintenance of smoking behavior, (c) change in smoking behavior, (d) smoking cessation, and (e) suggestions for cessation intervention strategies. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim were analyzed for thematic contents. Five themes emerged as the major factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior and they were culture, gender, addiction, health, and age. The first two themes were created as socio-cultural factors and the remaining three as personal factors. Results: In the Korean cultural context, smoking is a common thread in men's social world and a prime component of men's gender identity. Degree of addiction, health status, and age are the personal factors influencing Korean men's smoking behavior. Those who are older and see smoking as health risky behavior rather than socially sanctioned behavior perceive greater health risks of smoking, and more likely to quit or attempt to quit smoking. Conclusions and Implications: There is an urgent need for a smoking cessation program tailored to the specific needs of Korean American men. To do this effectively, health care workers must understand the role of the social, cultural, and personal factors influencing smoking behavior in this group.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:18Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.