2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163540
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative & Quantitative Data
Author(s):
Knafl, Kathleen; Gallo, Agatha M.; Angst, Denise; Knafl, George; Hadley, Emily; Smith, Carol
Author Details:
Kathleen Knafl, PhD, FAAN, Professor & Acting Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Kathleen.knafl@yale.edu; Agatha M. Gallo, PhD, RN; Denise Angst, PhD, RN; George Knafl, PhD; Emily Hadley, MS, RN; Carol Smith, MS, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Mixed method designs are well accepted in health care research. With the increasing use of mixed method designs researchers are challenged to devise analytic strategies that incorporate multiple types of data. Prior efforts to delineate analytic strategies for linking qualitative and quantitative data have focused on issues of consistency and the use of one type of data to validate or explain the other. However, relatively little attention has been directed to the use of mixed method approaches for typology development. The purpose of this presentation is to describe a mixed method strategy for typology development that combines qualitative themes and quantitative scores. Methods: Data come from a purposive sample of 44 parents (22 couples) of children with a genetic condition. Individually, parents completed qualitative interviews about family management of the child's condition and three structured measures of family functioning (Family APGAR, Feetham Family Functioning Survey, Family Hardiness Index). A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was completed to identify patterns of family management, and a cluster analysis of the quantitative data was completed to identify patterns of family functioning. Results: Each parent was categorized into a family management style based on the qualitative analysis and a family functioning category based on the cluster analysis. Final typology development will entail the identification of individual family patterns based on both parents' management style and cluster analysis categorization followed by comparison across families to identify distinct family management-functioning types. Conclusions and Implication: Results of the analysis are discussed in terms of traditional approaches to typology development and the contribution of mixed method analyses to a more sophisticated understanding of family functioning in the context of childhood chronic illness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Sponsors:
Funded by: National Human Genome Research Institutes, Ethical, Legal, Social, Implications Research Section
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Typology Development Combining Qualitative & Quantitative Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallo, Agatha M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAngst, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHadley, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Knafl, PhD, FAAN, Professor & Acting Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Kathleen.knafl@yale.edu; Agatha M. Gallo, PhD, RN; Denise Angst, PhD, RN; George Knafl, PhD; Emily Hadley, MS, RN; Carol Smith, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163540-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Mixed method designs are well accepted in health care research. With the increasing use of mixed method designs researchers are challenged to devise analytic strategies that incorporate multiple types of data. Prior efforts to delineate analytic strategies for linking qualitative and quantitative data have focused on issues of consistency and the use of one type of data to validate or explain the other. However, relatively little attention has been directed to the use of mixed method approaches for typology development. The purpose of this presentation is to describe a mixed method strategy for typology development that combines qualitative themes and quantitative scores. Methods: Data come from a purposive sample of 44 parents (22 couples) of children with a genetic condition. Individually, parents completed qualitative interviews about family management of the child's condition and three structured measures of family functioning (Family APGAR, Feetham Family Functioning Survey, Family Hardiness Index). A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was completed to identify patterns of family management, and a cluster analysis of the quantitative data was completed to identify patterns of family functioning. Results: Each parent was categorized into a family management style based on the qualitative analysis and a family functioning category based on the cluster analysis. Final typology development will entail the identification of individual family patterns based on both parents' management style and cluster analysis categorization followed by comparison across families to identify distinct family management-functioning types. Conclusions and Implication: Results of the analysis are discussed in terms of traditional approaches to typology development and the contribution of mixed method analyses to a more sophisticated understanding of family functioning in the context of childhood chronic illness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:20Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by: National Human Genome Research Institutes, Ethical, Legal, Social, Implications Research Sectionen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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