Prospective study of quality of life of patients receiving treatment for prostate cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163542
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prospective study of quality of life of patients receiving treatment for prostate cancer
Author(s):
Lev, Elise; Eller, Lucille S.; Junchaya, Claudia; Gejerman, Glen; Colella, Joan; Lane, Patricia; Scrofine, Suzanne; Kolassa, John; Esposito, Michael; Lanteri, Vincent; Scheuch, John; Munver, Ravi
Author Details:
Elise Lev, Ed.D., RN, Associate Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: eliselev@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Lucille S. Eller, PhD, RN; Claudia Junchaya, BA; Glen Gejerman, MD; Joan Colella, MSN, RN; Patricia Lane, MSW; Suzanne Scrofine, RN, BS, RNBC, OCN; John Kolassa, PhD; Michael Esposito, MD; Vincent Lanteri, MD; John Scheuch, MD; Ravi Munver, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) describe differences in Quality of Life (QOL) before and after three types of treatment for Prostate Cancer: Radical Prostatectomy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) + seed implantation, or IMRT + High Dose Rate, and (2) investigate demographic, physical, and psychosocial variables that impact QOL of patients with prostate cancer on three different occasions: baseline (prior to treatment), one and three months after completing treatment. QOL was conceptualized as a multidimensional construct that reflects the impact of illness and treatment on physical, psychological, social and functional dimensions of well being. Methods: Participants (n=104) completed measures of biographic data, physiological measures including urinary, bowel and sexual symptoms [Prostate Symptom Self Report], and psychological measures including anxiety [ SCL-90], depression [CESD], coping [Ways of Coping Scale], self-care self-efficacy [Strategies Used by Patients to Promote Health], and QOL [FACT-P]. A standard one-way analysis of variance was performed on measures in order to describe differences in the three treatment groups. Regression models were used to assess the degree to which independent variables predicted QOL. Results: Urinary symptoms were significantly higher one month after treatment in all groups (p=< .05). In the seed implantation group, anxiety was significantly higher (p=0.04) and depression was significantly higher (p=0.05) three months after treatment. Bowel, urinary, sexual symptoms predicted physical QOL. Functional QOL was predicted by depression, self-care self-efficacy, bowel and urinary symptoms. Social QOL was predicted by anxiety, depression, self-care self-efficacy, problem focused coping, and sexual symptoms. Emotional QOL was predicted by anxiety, depression, self-care self-efficacy, and emotion focused coping. Conclusions and Implications: Findings may provide health care providers with knowledge about treatment sequelae for prostate cancer, enable health care providers to educate patients about QOL outcomes of treatment for prostate cancer, and enable patients to make more informed treatment decisions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProspective study of quality of life of patients receiving treatment for prostate canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLev, Eliseen_US
dc.contributor.authorEller, Lucille S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJunchaya, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGejerman, Glenen_US
dc.contributor.authorColella, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLane, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorScrofine, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKolassa, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorEsposito, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorLanteri, Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.authorScheuch, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorMunver, Ravien_US
dc.author.detailsElise Lev, Ed.D., RN, Associate Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: eliselev@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Lucille S. Eller, PhD, RN; Claudia Junchaya, BA; Glen Gejerman, MD; Joan Colella, MSN, RN; Patricia Lane, MSW; Suzanne Scrofine, RN, BS, RNBC, OCN; John Kolassa, PhD; Michael Esposito, MD; Vincent Lanteri, MD; John Scheuch, MD; Ravi Munver, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163542-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this study were to (1) describe differences in Quality of Life (QOL) before and after three types of treatment for Prostate Cancer: Radical Prostatectomy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) + seed implantation, or IMRT + High Dose Rate, and (2) investigate demographic, physical, and psychosocial variables that impact QOL of patients with prostate cancer on three different occasions: baseline (prior to treatment), one and three months after completing treatment. QOL was conceptualized as a multidimensional construct that reflects the impact of illness and treatment on physical, psychological, social and functional dimensions of well being. Methods: Participants (n=104) completed measures of biographic data, physiological measures including urinary, bowel and sexual symptoms [Prostate Symptom Self Report], and psychological measures including anxiety [ SCL-90], depression [CESD], coping [Ways of Coping Scale], self-care self-efficacy [Strategies Used by Patients to Promote Health], and QOL [FACT-P]. A standard one-way analysis of variance was performed on measures in order to describe differences in the three treatment groups. Regression models were used to assess the degree to which independent variables predicted QOL. Results: Urinary symptoms were significantly higher one month after treatment in all groups (p=< .05). In the seed implantation group, anxiety was significantly higher (p=0.04) and depression was significantly higher (p=0.05) three months after treatment. Bowel, urinary, sexual symptoms predicted physical QOL. Functional QOL was predicted by depression, self-care self-efficacy, bowel and urinary symptoms. Social QOL was predicted by anxiety, depression, self-care self-efficacy, problem focused coping, and sexual symptoms. Emotional QOL was predicted by anxiety, depression, self-care self-efficacy, and emotion focused coping. Conclusions and Implications: Findings may provide health care providers with knowledge about treatment sequelae for prostate cancer, enable health care providers to educate patients about QOL outcomes of treatment for prostate cancer, and enable patients to make more informed treatment decisions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:22Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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