2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163545
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding and Postpartum Depression
Author(s):
McCarter-Spaulding, Deborah; Andrews Horowitz, June
Author Details:
Deborah McCarter-Spaulding, RNC, MS, IBCLC, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Mendon, Massachusetts, USA, email: mccarter@spaulding.cc; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Promoting breastfeeding can yield health benefits for mothers and infants. However, maternal factors such as postpartum depression may interfere with women's ability to sustain breastfeeding. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were to examine the relationship of maternal demographic factors and severity of depression symptoms to breastfeeding, and to test the effect of a maternal-infant interaction intervention on breastfeeding. Methods: As part of a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a maternal-infant interaction intervention for depressed mothers and their infants, researchers screened a community-based sample of women for symptoms of depression at 2-4 weeks postpartum. Women who screened positively for depression symptoms completed a demographic data tool and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to examine relationships of maternal demographic factors and severity of depression symptoms to breastfeeding pattern (bottle, combination, or breast only). The effect of the intervention on breastfeeding was tested by analysis of variance. Results: The sample comprised 122 women who exhibited symptoms of postpartum depression. At 4-8 weeks postpartum, 62.3% of the women were breastfeeding. Of the maternal factors examined, only maternal education had a significant (positive) relationship to breastfeeding. Severity of depression was not related to breastfeeding. The coaching intervention had no effect on breastfeeding. Conclusions and Implications: Except for maternal education. factors expected to influence breastfeeding had no effect, and a surprisingly high percentage of women was breastfeeding at 4-8 weeks postpartum. These outcomes question assumptions that depressed mothers may be less motivated to breastfeed than their non-depressed counterparts. To support breastfeeding among depressed women, testing targeted interventions is needed. Moreover, management of postpartum depression requires attention to breastfeeding. Variables not measured such as breastfeeding self-efficacy may exert a more significant effect than demographic factors or depression, and merit future investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding and Postpartum Depressionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCarter-Spaulding, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrews Horowitz, Juneen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah McCarter-Spaulding, RNC, MS, IBCLC, PhD Student, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Mendon, Massachusetts, USA, email: mccarter@spaulding.cc; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, BC, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163545-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Promoting breastfeeding can yield health benefits for mothers and infants. However, maternal factors such as postpartum depression may interfere with women's ability to sustain breastfeeding. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were to examine the relationship of maternal demographic factors and severity of depression symptoms to breastfeeding, and to test the effect of a maternal-infant interaction intervention on breastfeeding. Methods: As part of a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a maternal-infant interaction intervention for depressed mothers and their infants, researchers screened a community-based sample of women for symptoms of depression at 2-4 weeks postpartum. Women who screened positively for depression symptoms completed a demographic data tool and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to examine relationships of maternal demographic factors and severity of depression symptoms to breastfeeding pattern (bottle, combination, or breast only). The effect of the intervention on breastfeeding was tested by analysis of variance. Results: The sample comprised 122 women who exhibited symptoms of postpartum depression. At 4-8 weeks postpartum, 62.3% of the women were breastfeeding. Of the maternal factors examined, only maternal education had a significant (positive) relationship to breastfeeding. Severity of depression was not related to breastfeeding. The coaching intervention had no effect on breastfeeding. Conclusions and Implications: Except for maternal education. factors expected to influence breastfeeding had no effect, and a surprisingly high percentage of women was breastfeeding at 4-8 weeks postpartum. These outcomes question assumptions that depressed mothers may be less motivated to breastfeed than their non-depressed counterparts. To support breastfeeding among depressed women, testing targeted interventions is needed. Moreover, management of postpartum depression requires attention to breastfeeding. Variables not measured such as breastfeeding self-efficacy may exert a more significant effect than demographic factors or depression, and merit future investigation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:25Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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