2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163546
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Synergistic Model of Nursing Intuitive Clinical Judgment
Author(s):
McCurry, Mary
Author Details:
Mary McCurry, RNBC, ANP, ACNP, Doctoral Candidate, Faculty, Boston College, Somerset, Massachusetts, USA, email: mmccurry@umassd.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is upheld as a key factor of expert nursing practice. While there are many qualitative studies describing intuitive knowing, there is no model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment and no operational definition of nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Without this understanding, intuitive knowing cannot enhance clinical judgment to improve practice and positively impact quality health outcomes. The specific aim of this research was to develop a model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment and to derive an operational definition of nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Methods: This study involved a review of the extant nursing research to cluster and summarize the antecedents, attributes, and consequences of intuition, insight, tacit knowing, synergy, and clinical decision-making. Definitions of intuition, insight, and tacit knowing were developed and used as the foundations for the model. The model was advanced well beyond current knowledge by translating and applying groundbreaking data from the fields of neurophysiology, biochemistry, psychology, education, and mind-body medicine into nursing. Results: Antecedents of intuitive clinical judgment were identified as individual nurse's intuitiveness, a supportive clinical environment, nurse-patient relatedness, nurse presence, and a holistic perspective. Intuition, insight, and tacit knowing are not synonyms. Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is a synergy of analytical decision-making and insight triggered by intuitive awareness. This synergistic process occurs simultaneously with a measurable relaxation response. The relaxation response allows anxiety levels to drop, endorphins to decrease, and the mind to uncloud, resulting in nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Conclusions and Implications: Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is a valid way of knowing in nursing. By developing and testing a model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment, this expert knowledge can enhance decision-making, improve nursing practice and positively impact quality health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Synergistic Model of Nursing Intuitive Clinical Judgmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCurry, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary McCurry, RNBC, ANP, ACNP, Doctoral Candidate, Faculty, Boston College, Somerset, Massachusetts, USA, email: mmccurry@umassd.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163546-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is upheld as a key factor of expert nursing practice. While there are many qualitative studies describing intuitive knowing, there is no model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment and no operational definition of nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Without this understanding, intuitive knowing cannot enhance clinical judgment to improve practice and positively impact quality health outcomes. The specific aim of this research was to develop a model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment and to derive an operational definition of nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Methods: This study involved a review of the extant nursing research to cluster and summarize the antecedents, attributes, and consequences of intuition, insight, tacit knowing, synergy, and clinical decision-making. Definitions of intuition, insight, and tacit knowing were developed and used as the foundations for the model. The model was advanced well beyond current knowledge by translating and applying groundbreaking data from the fields of neurophysiology, biochemistry, psychology, education, and mind-body medicine into nursing. Results: Antecedents of intuitive clinical judgment were identified as individual nurse's intuitiveness, a supportive clinical environment, nurse-patient relatedness, nurse presence, and a holistic perspective. Intuition, insight, and tacit knowing are not synonyms. Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is a synergy of analytical decision-making and insight triggered by intuitive awareness. This synergistic process occurs simultaneously with a measurable relaxation response. The relaxation response allows anxiety levels to drop, endorphins to decrease, and the mind to uncloud, resulting in nursing intuitive clinical judgment. Conclusions and Implications: Nursing intuitive clinical judgment is a valid way of knowing in nursing. By developing and testing a model of the process of nursing intuitive clinical judgment, this expert knowledge can enhance decision-making, improve nursing practice and positively impact quality health outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:26Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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