2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163547
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Status and Health Behaviors of Preterm Children at Age 12
Author(s):
Miller, Robin; Hawes, Katheleen; Sullivan, Mary C.
Author Details:
Robin Miller, PhD, RN, Research Nurse Coordinator, Women and Infants' Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: romiller@wihri.org; Katheleen Hawes, MS, APRN; Mary C. Sullivan, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Preterm infants are at risk for increased health problems, but the long-term effects of prematurity and perinatal morbidity are untested. The purpose is to examine the effects of perinatal morbidity on health status and health behaviors across four preterm groups and a full term comparison group at age 12. Secondly, environmental factors that influence health including socioeconomic status (SES), perception of health, home environment, parental support and involvement, and family adaptability and cohesion were examined. Methods: The sample of 191 12-year-olds was grouped at birth by perinatal morbidity into a full-term healthy control group and four groups of preterm infants: healthy, medically ill, neurologically ill, and small-for-gestational age preterm infants. Health status (neurological, motor, psychological) was assessed by health history and physical examination verified by the child's medical records, Bruinincks, and the Child Behavior Checklist. Health behaviors were reported on a standardized questionnaires by the child on health values, sleep, hygiene, exercise, nutrition, seat belt use, sedentary behavior, role models, and substance abuse. Environmental factors were measured by the Hollingshead, Family Connectedness Inventory, EA-HOME, PCRI, and FACES-III. Results: Chi Square and ANOVA showed that perinatal morbidity influences health status including chronic conditions such as asthma, allergies, and neurological status at age 12. SES, family connectedness, home environment, and peer modeling were associated with more positive health behaviors Conclusions and Implications: Our research adds to previous findings that a majority of preterm children are normal and healthy; however as a group, they have higher rates of adverse health conditions. An understanding of factors that influence health status and health behaviors can help in the development and implementation of appropriate interventions for these children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Status and Health Behaviors of Preterm Children at Age 12en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHawes, Katheleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Mary C.en_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Miller, PhD, RN, Research Nurse Coordinator, Women and Infants' Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: romiller@wihri.org; Katheleen Hawes, MS, APRN; Mary C. Sullivan, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163547-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Preterm infants are at risk for increased health problems, but the long-term effects of prematurity and perinatal morbidity are untested. The purpose is to examine the effects of perinatal morbidity on health status and health behaviors across four preterm groups and a full term comparison group at age 12. Secondly, environmental factors that influence health including socioeconomic status (SES), perception of health, home environment, parental support and involvement, and family adaptability and cohesion were examined. Methods: The sample of 191 12-year-olds was grouped at birth by perinatal morbidity into a full-term healthy control group and four groups of preterm infants: healthy, medically ill, neurologically ill, and small-for-gestational age preterm infants. Health status (neurological, motor, psychological) was assessed by health history and physical examination verified by the child's medical records, Bruinincks, and the Child Behavior Checklist. Health behaviors were reported on a standardized questionnaires by the child on health values, sleep, hygiene, exercise, nutrition, seat belt use, sedentary behavior, role models, and substance abuse. Environmental factors were measured by the Hollingshead, Family Connectedness Inventory, EA-HOME, PCRI, and FACES-III. Results: Chi Square and ANOVA showed that perinatal morbidity influences health status including chronic conditions such as asthma, allergies, and neurological status at age 12. SES, family connectedness, home environment, and peer modeling were associated with more positive health behaviors Conclusions and Implications: Our research adds to previous findings that a majority of preterm children are normal and healthy; however as a group, they have higher rates of adverse health conditions. An understanding of factors that influence health status and health behaviors can help in the development and implementation of appropriate interventions for these children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:27Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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