Quality of Living in Long-Term Care Environments: A Psychometric Analysis of the H.O.M.E. Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163548
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Living in Long-Term Care Environments: A Psychometric Analysis of the H.O.M.E. Scale
Author(s):
Molony, Sheila
Author Details:
Sheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Research related to quality of life in long-term care settings has been hampered by murky conceptual definitions and a paucity of measurement tools designed to capture outcomes sensitive to environmental variables. The primary aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the H.O.M.E. Scale, an instrument to measure quality of living in an environmental context as conceptualized by feeling "at-home" in a place. Home was defined as an existential place of meaning and optimum person-environment relationship characterized by dynamic energy transactions between the self and the lifeworld. Methods: The H.O.M.E. Scale is a 25-item Likert scale with a balance of positive and negative statements. The scale (refined and optimized during pilot testing) was administered to 200 older adults living in a variety of community and residential living situations across the state of Connecticut. Results: Principal components analysis provided support for criterion-related validity, eliciting a 3-factor solution consistent with theoretical predictions. Dimensions of person-environment relationship elicited were "attachment," "disconnection" and "ownership." Mean scores for at-home-ness were lower for institution dwellers than for community dwellers even after controlling for health, choice in dwelling, and housing satisfaction (Wilk's Lambda F(4,266) =2.71, p< .05). Reliability of the home scale was supported with internal consistency reliability of 0.95 for the entire scale and 0.84-0.95 for subscales. Test-retest reliability was robust in participants who completed a second H.O.M.E. Scale 3 to 4 weeks after the first (r = 0.86, p< .01). Conclusions and Implications: The H.O.M.E. Scale demonstrates sound psychometric properties and provides a research tool for research to narrow the knowledge gap related to person-environment relationship. The instrument is unique in its conception of at-home-ness as a vital outcome in eldercare and will help the research community evaluate the outcomes of interventions to improve quality of living in long-term care environments.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Living in Long-Term Care Environments: A Psychometric Analysis of the H.O.M.E. Scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolony, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsSheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163548-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Research related to quality of life in long-term care settings has been hampered by murky conceptual definitions and a paucity of measurement tools designed to capture outcomes sensitive to environmental variables. The primary aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the H.O.M.E. Scale, an instrument to measure quality of living in an environmental context as conceptualized by feeling "at-home" in a place. Home was defined as an existential place of meaning and optimum person-environment relationship characterized by dynamic energy transactions between the self and the lifeworld. Methods: The H.O.M.E. Scale is a 25-item Likert scale with a balance of positive and negative statements. The scale (refined and optimized during pilot testing) was administered to 200 older adults living in a variety of community and residential living situations across the state of Connecticut. Results: Principal components analysis provided support for criterion-related validity, eliciting a 3-factor solution consistent with theoretical predictions. Dimensions of person-environment relationship elicited were "attachment," "disconnection" and "ownership." Mean scores for at-home-ness were lower for institution dwellers than for community dwellers even after controlling for health, choice in dwelling, and housing satisfaction (Wilk's Lambda F(4,266) =2.71, p< .05). Reliability of the home scale was supported with internal consistency reliability of 0.95 for the entire scale and 0.84-0.95 for subscales. Test-retest reliability was robust in participants who completed a second H.O.M.E. Scale 3 to 4 weeks after the first (r = 0.86, p< .01). Conclusions and Implications: The H.O.M.E. Scale demonstrates sound psychometric properties and provides a research tool for research to narrow the knowledge gap related to person-environment relationship. The instrument is unique in its conception of at-home-ness as a vital outcome in eldercare and will help the research community evaluate the outcomes of interventions to improve quality of living in long-term care environments.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:28Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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