Concordance of Selected Self-Reported Provider Recommendations for the Care of Patients with Diabetes With the Recommendations of the American Diabetes AssociationÆs Evidenced Based Guidelines Using a National Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163549
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concordance of Selected Self-Reported Provider Recommendations for the Care of Patients with Diabetes With the Recommendations of the American Diabetes AssociationÆs Evidenced Based Guidelines Using a National Survey
Author(s):
Morritt Taub, Leslie-Faith
Author Details:
Leslie-Faith Morritt Taub, RN, Columbia University, Staten Island, New York, USA, email: lmt38@columbia.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: It is projected that the prevalence rate of diabetes will increase to 29 million people by 2050 if present trends continue. Modifiable risk factors for prevention and treatment of diabetes include diet, exercise, smoking cessation, alcohol cessation for those with excessive intake, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, and foot and eye care. Understanding the predictors of provider advice will allow us to target populations that are less likely to receive this care. Methods: The National Health Interview Survey, 2001 was used in a secondary data analysis in order to assess how closely providers were now approaching the recommendations of the eight processes-of-care advised by the American Diabetes Association. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Hispanics and African Americans were significantly less likely to be advised get pneumonia or influenza vaccines or to see or speak to an eye doctor. Those on no medication for their diabetes were significantly less likely to receive diet advice, pneumonia or influenza vaccines, and see or speak to a foot or eye doctor however they were significantly more likely to receive alcohol cessation counseling. Those on pills for their diabetes were significantly less likely to receive pneumonia or influenza vaccines or see or speak to with a foot doctor however they were more likely to receive exercise advise. Those ages 65 and over were significantly less likely to receive diet, exercise, and smoking cessation advice, however they were significantly more likely to receive influenza and pneumonia vaccines. Conclusions and Implications: Medication regimen, age, and minority status are factors that are significantly related to the provision of the eight processes-of-care. Understanding how these factors relate to provider advice will allow us to target these subgroups who are not getting optimal diabetes care and providers who need to be made aware of this.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcordance of Selected Self-Reported Provider Recommendations for the Care of Patients with Diabetes With the Recommendations of the American Diabetes AssociationÆs Evidenced Based Guidelines Using a National Surveyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorritt Taub, Leslie-Faithen_US
dc.author.detailsLeslie-Faith Morritt Taub, RN, Columbia University, Staten Island, New York, USA, email: lmt38@columbia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163549-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: It is projected that the prevalence rate of diabetes will increase to 29 million people by 2050 if present trends continue. Modifiable risk factors for prevention and treatment of diabetes include diet, exercise, smoking cessation, alcohol cessation for those with excessive intake, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, and foot and eye care. Understanding the predictors of provider advice will allow us to target populations that are less likely to receive this care. Methods: The National Health Interview Survey, 2001 was used in a secondary data analysis in order to assess how closely providers were now approaching the recommendations of the eight processes-of-care advised by the American Diabetes Association. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Hispanics and African Americans were significantly less likely to be advised get pneumonia or influenza vaccines or to see or speak to an eye doctor. Those on no medication for their diabetes were significantly less likely to receive diet advice, pneumonia or influenza vaccines, and see or speak to a foot or eye doctor however they were significantly more likely to receive alcohol cessation counseling. Those on pills for their diabetes were significantly less likely to receive pneumonia or influenza vaccines or see or speak to with a foot doctor however they were more likely to receive exercise advise. Those ages 65 and over were significantly less likely to receive diet, exercise, and smoking cessation advice, however they were significantly more likely to receive influenza and pneumonia vaccines. Conclusions and Implications: Medication regimen, age, and minority status are factors that are significantly related to the provision of the eight processes-of-care. Understanding how these factors relate to provider advice will allow us to target these subgroups who are not getting optimal diabetes care and providers who need to be made aware of this.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:29Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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