2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163550
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Workforce Demographics to Develop Strategies to Recruit Men into Nursing
Author(s):
Newschwander, Gregg; Palumbo, Mary Val
Author Details:
Gregg Newschwander, PhD, RN, Chair, University of Vermont, Department of Nursing, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: newsch@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, ND, APRN
Abstract:
Purpose: One reported strategy to help ease the nursing shortage is to recruit more men. Little research has been conducted to determine what target audience is appropriate, or whether the roles depicted in ads are likely to generate interest among prospective male students. The purpose of this study was to examine demographics, job placement and job satisfaction data among male nurses as the bases of formulating successful recruitment strategies. Method: A survey of 6,319 Vermont registered nurses (70% response rate) was completed in March, 2003. The instrument includes the minimum data set as recommended by Colleagues in Caring with additional questions on job satisfaction and intention to leave. 4,228 reported that they worked as an RN in Vermont. Chi-square analyses were used for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables to compare male and female nurse demographics, practice environment and job satisfaction. Results: In the statewide sample, 210 were male and 4,018 female. Significant differences (p. < .05) existed in basic nursing preparation, highest degree and type of degree earned, years of experience as an RN, and choice of setting/nursing role. Among males, 66.2 % received their basic nursing education in an AD program. While females were more likely to have earned a higher degree in nursing, 72% of males had earned a baccalaureate degree in another field. The majority of males worked full time in hospitals (70.5%), provided direct patient care (74%), and were more likely to work with adult populations in emergency and critical care areas, or in psychiatric settings than females. Job satisfaction scores between the groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions and Implications: Efforts to draw men into the profession could be more successful if designed to promote proven areas of interest and if targeted toward a specific population other than high school students. Designing curricula that offer accelerated pathways to initial licensure for those with degrees in other fields may draw more men to this level of preparation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Workforce Demographics to Develop Strategies to Recruit Men into Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNewschwander, Greggen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen_US
dc.author.detailsGregg Newschwander, PhD, RN, Chair, University of Vermont, Department of Nursing, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: newsch@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, ND, APRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163550-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: One reported strategy to help ease the nursing shortage is to recruit more men. Little research has been conducted to determine what target audience is appropriate, or whether the roles depicted in ads are likely to generate interest among prospective male students. The purpose of this study was to examine demographics, job placement and job satisfaction data among male nurses as the bases of formulating successful recruitment strategies. Method: A survey of 6,319 Vermont registered nurses (70% response rate) was completed in March, 2003. The instrument includes the minimum data set as recommended by Colleagues in Caring with additional questions on job satisfaction and intention to leave. 4,228 reported that they worked as an RN in Vermont. Chi-square analyses were used for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables to compare male and female nurse demographics, practice environment and job satisfaction. Results: In the statewide sample, 210 were male and 4,018 female. Significant differences (p. < .05) existed in basic nursing preparation, highest degree and type of degree earned, years of experience as an RN, and choice of setting/nursing role. Among males, 66.2 % received their basic nursing education in an AD program. While females were more likely to have earned a higher degree in nursing, 72% of males had earned a baccalaureate degree in another field. The majority of males worked full time in hospitals (70.5%), provided direct patient care (74%), and were more likely to work with adult populations in emergency and critical care areas, or in psychiatric settings than females. Job satisfaction scores between the groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions and Implications: Efforts to draw men into the profession could be more successful if designed to promote proven areas of interest and if targeted toward a specific population other than high school students. Designing curricula that offer accelerated pathways to initial licensure for those with degrees in other fields may draw more men to this level of preparation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:30Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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