2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163551
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Adherence in Women Managing Chronic Health Conditions
Author(s):
Nichols, Lynn
Author Details:
Lynn Nichols, RN, PhD, Visiting Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College, Department of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: lnichols@sjfc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Health care providers are expected to assist patients to adhere to health care regimens in order to maximize client health status. However, nonadherence is common and problematic. The study's primary purpose was to examine the relationship of selected variables in women with chronic health conditions and adherence to prescribed medication, diet, and physical activity regimens. Methods: This study, set within self-determination and personality theories, was descriptive and correlational, with a longitudinal component. With a volunteer sample of 107 women, questionnaires (including the NEO-FFI, the REALM, and the Medication Complexity Index) and interviews were used to gather data, usually in the homes of participants, during an initial session (Time 1) and 6 weeks later (Time 2). Results: Regression analyses were used to test hypotheses to identify whether predicted relationships between the independent variables and the dependent variable of adherence at Time 2 existed. Hypotheses that addressed autonomy supportiveness of the provider, autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, depressive symptomatology, perceived availability of social support, and level of adherence at Time 1 were supported. Multivariate analyses with adherence at Time 1 and at Time 2 as dependent variables demonstrated the overall models were significant and accounted for 35.2% of the variance in adherence at Time 1 and 28.9% at Time 2. The independent variables contributing a significant amount of unique variance included autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, and depressive symptomatology. Conclusions & Implications: The findings of this study provide information about the characteristics of adherence to three components of a health care regimen. The practicality of a screening tool for clinical practice to identify the degree to which nonadherence may be a challenge for a given patient and the health care provider was supported. Based on this study's findings, interventional studies for improving adherence could reasonably focus on autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, and depressive symptomatology.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Adherence in Women Managing Chronic Health Conditionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Lynnen_US
dc.author.detailsLynn Nichols, RN, PhD, Visiting Associate Professor, St. John Fisher College, Department of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: lnichols@sjfc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163551-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Health care providers are expected to assist patients to adhere to health care regimens in order to maximize client health status. However, nonadherence is common and problematic. The study's primary purpose was to examine the relationship of selected variables in women with chronic health conditions and adherence to prescribed medication, diet, and physical activity regimens. Methods: This study, set within self-determination and personality theories, was descriptive and correlational, with a longitudinal component. With a volunteer sample of 107 women, questionnaires (including the NEO-FFI, the REALM, and the Medication Complexity Index) and interviews were used to gather data, usually in the homes of participants, during an initial session (Time 1) and 6 weeks later (Time 2). Results: Regression analyses were used to test hypotheses to identify whether predicted relationships between the independent variables and the dependent variable of adherence at Time 2 existed. Hypotheses that addressed autonomy supportiveness of the provider, autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, depressive symptomatology, perceived availability of social support, and level of adherence at Time 1 were supported. Multivariate analyses with adherence at Time 1 and at Time 2 as dependent variables demonstrated the overall models were significant and accounted for 35.2% of the variance in adherence at Time 1 and 28.9% at Time 2. The independent variables contributing a significant amount of unique variance included autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, and depressive symptomatology. Conclusions & Implications: The findings of this study provide information about the characteristics of adherence to three components of a health care regimen. The practicality of a screening tool for clinical practice to identify the degree to which nonadherence may be a challenge for a given patient and the health care provider was supported. Based on this study's findings, interventional studies for improving adherence could reasonably focus on autonomous motivation, conscientiousness, and depressive symptomatology.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:31Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.