2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163554
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-life care: The family caregiverÆs trajectory
Author(s):
Penrod, Janice; Hupcey, Judith E.
Author Details:
Janice Penrod, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, The Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jlp198@psu.edu; Judith E. Hupcey, CRNP, EdD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to advance an understanding of the trajectory of end of life caregiving from the perspective of family caregivers. Methods: This study employed grounded theory methods. The sample included adult caregivers (n=45) who provided care to another adult through the end of life. Interviews that focused on caregiving experiences were conducted. Analytic techniques included multiple iterations of coding and modeling to produce a theoretical framework for understanding patterns of caregiving across at the end of life. Results: Participants in this study provided care to family members who faced a wide range of life-limiting conditions, including a range of cancers, ALS, and more chronic conditions (e.g., congestive heart or renal failure). A trajectory of caregiving through the end of life was derived. Three critical junctures mark significant transitions in phases of the end of life caregiving experience: getting the diagnosis, focusing on comfort care, and the death of the care recipient. Phases of caregiving included: knowing that something's not right, treating or hoping for the best, active caregiving, and building a new life. Behavioral markers and strategies that were found to be supportive of caregiving activities are described for each phase. Conclusions and Implications: Illness trajectories reveal the typical course of functional decline preceding the end of life. Such trajectories are useful in anticipating the course of decline and planning for services that may be needed across the course of varied illnesses. In contrast, when the perspective of the family caregiver is examined; there is a remarkable similarity of the caregiving trajectory, regardless of the course of the illness. While the duration of phases varies, the critical attributes of each phase are stable across varied caregiving contexts. This supports the development of phase-specific interventions to support the caregiver in this critically important role.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-life care: The family caregiverÆs trajectoryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPenrod, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHupcey, Judith E.en_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Penrod, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, The Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jlp198@psu.edu; Judith E. Hupcey, CRNP, EdDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163554-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to advance an understanding of the trajectory of end of life caregiving from the perspective of family caregivers. Methods: This study employed grounded theory methods. The sample included adult caregivers (n=45) who provided care to another adult through the end of life. Interviews that focused on caregiving experiences were conducted. Analytic techniques included multiple iterations of coding and modeling to produce a theoretical framework for understanding patterns of caregiving across at the end of life. Results: Participants in this study provided care to family members who faced a wide range of life-limiting conditions, including a range of cancers, ALS, and more chronic conditions (e.g., congestive heart or renal failure). A trajectory of caregiving through the end of life was derived. Three critical junctures mark significant transitions in phases of the end of life caregiving experience: getting the diagnosis, focusing on comfort care, and the death of the care recipient. Phases of caregiving included: knowing that something's not right, treating or hoping for the best, active caregiving, and building a new life. Behavioral markers and strategies that were found to be supportive of caregiving activities are described for each phase. Conclusions and Implications: Illness trajectories reveal the typical course of functional decline preceding the end of life. Such trajectories are useful in anticipating the course of decline and planning for services that may be needed across the course of varied illnesses. In contrast, when the perspective of the family caregiver is examined; there is a remarkable similarity of the caregiving trajectory, regardless of the course of the illness. While the duration of phases varies, the critical attributes of each phase are stable across varied caregiving contexts. This supports the development of phase-specific interventions to support the caregiver in this critically important role.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:34Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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