2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163555
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Trends in Nurse Practitioner Prescribing Practices: 1996-2003
Author(s):
Pulcini, Joyce; Vampola, David
Author Details:
Joyce Pulcini, PhD, RN, PNP, FAAN, Associate Professor, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: pulcinjo@bc.edu; David Vampola
Abstract:
Purpose: This research presents trend data on nurse practitioner prescribing practices from 1996?2003. Methods: Data were collected from attendees at two to four national nurse practitioner conferences in the United States in each of four calendar years. The study samples from 1996-2003 included 5381 nurse practitioners out of 8503 attendees (response rate of 63.2 %). Anonymous survey forms were included in the registration packets of conference participants. Answers to the survey were inscribed by the respondent on machine-readable forms, which were scanned for analysis using mark recognition technologies where appropriate. Respondents were asked to fill out only one survey per year. Statistical methods used were frequencies and chi square analyses. Results: The top four categories of drugs prescribed in the four surveys remained the same: analgesics/anti-inflammatory medications, antibiotics, antifungals/topical steroids and anti-allergy medications. Trends over time included prescribing of increased numbers of medications per day, increased prescribing of medications to treat mental health problems, increased prescribing of narcotics, significantly fewer drugs prescribed in first year of practice, significantly more drugs prescribed the more years in practice, and significantly higher rates of prescribing in rural areas for all drug categories. Conclusions and Implications: While NP practice characteristics and responsibilities have remained relatively stable over 7 years, prescribing practices have increased and broadened for advanced practice nurses. The 1996 to 2003 data confirm that nurse practitioners are increasingly prescribing medications for mental health problems as well as a broadening range of general medications in primary care. Nurse practitioners are taking on increasingly independent and comprehensive roles particularly in prescribing practices particularly in rural areas. Practices in rural areas may be less restricted than in urban or suburban areas, thus future research might examine differences in practice barriers in rural vs. urban or suburban areas.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTrends in Nurse Practitioner Prescribing Practices: 1996-2003en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPulcini, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorVampola, Daviden_US
dc.author.detailsJoyce Pulcini, PhD, RN, PNP, FAAN, Associate Professor, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: pulcinjo@bc.edu; David Vampolaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163555-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This research presents trend data on nurse practitioner prescribing practices from 1996?2003. Methods: Data were collected from attendees at two to four national nurse practitioner conferences in the United States in each of four calendar years. The study samples from 1996-2003 included 5381 nurse practitioners out of 8503 attendees (response rate of 63.2 %). Anonymous survey forms were included in the registration packets of conference participants. Answers to the survey were inscribed by the respondent on machine-readable forms, which were scanned for analysis using mark recognition technologies where appropriate. Respondents were asked to fill out only one survey per year. Statistical methods used were frequencies and chi square analyses. Results: The top four categories of drugs prescribed in the four surveys remained the same: analgesics/anti-inflammatory medications, antibiotics, antifungals/topical steroids and anti-allergy medications. Trends over time included prescribing of increased numbers of medications per day, increased prescribing of medications to treat mental health problems, increased prescribing of narcotics, significantly fewer drugs prescribed in first year of practice, significantly more drugs prescribed the more years in practice, and significantly higher rates of prescribing in rural areas for all drug categories. Conclusions and Implications: While NP practice characteristics and responsibilities have remained relatively stable over 7 years, prescribing practices have increased and broadened for advanced practice nurses. The 1996 to 2003 data confirm that nurse practitioners are increasingly prescribing medications for mental health problems as well as a broadening range of general medications in primary care. Nurse practitioners are taking on increasingly independent and comprehensive roles particularly in prescribing practices particularly in rural areas. Practices in rural areas may be less restricted than in urban or suburban areas, thus future research might examine differences in practice barriers in rural vs. urban or suburban areas.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:36Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.