2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163556
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Female Coping with Cardiac Rehabilitation after a Cardiac Event
Author(s):
Quigley, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Quigley, PhD, ARNP, CRRN, Associate Center Director/Team Leader for Injurious Falls, VISN 8 Patient Safety Center of Inquiry, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: Patricia.Quigley@va.gov
Abstract:
Purpose: Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women. Although beneficial in reducing risk after a cardiac event, cardiac rehabilitation is underutilized by women. The purpose of this research study was to explore women's coping with integrating a Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program into their lives. A secondary purpose was to explore correspondence with Lazarus' theoretical concepts of appraisal and coping. Methods: Thirteen women completed a demographic data sheet and participated in audiotaped interviews conducted by the nurse researcher. An interview guide was used to have the women describe their coping as they neared completion of a Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Content analysis was used to analyze the data for common elements and other ways of coping. Results: Analysis of interview data resulted in 6 common elements (those occurring in 7 or more of the women's interviews) and 4 other ways of coping with cardiac rehabilitation (those occurring in less than 7 of the women's interviews). The common elements were: managing external demands (home maintenance, family needs, work or social commitments, cost, transportation), perceiving benefit, perceiving support of family, health team, or work place, valuing cardiac rehabilitation, managing internal demands (challenges to physical, emotional, or psychological strength), and prioritizing self-care. Four other ways of coping were: demonstrating determination, managing chronic illness demands, illuminating perceptions, and developing ability to use exercise equipment. Further analysis revealed correspondence with appraisal and coping as theorized by Lazarus. Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study described ways of coping that provide a beginning foundation for developing interventions related to improving women's participation in cardiac rehabilitation. Interventions based on women's perspectives may improve cardiac rehabilitation participation and female patients' outcomes. Improving outcomes is integral to evidence-based nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFemale Coping with Cardiac Rehabilitation after a Cardiac Eventen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Quigley, PhD, ARNP, CRRN, Associate Center Director/Team Leader for Injurious Falls, VISN 8 Patient Safety Center of Inquiry, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: Patricia.Quigley@va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163556-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women. Although beneficial in reducing risk after a cardiac event, cardiac rehabilitation is underutilized by women. The purpose of this research study was to explore women's coping with integrating a Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program into their lives. A secondary purpose was to explore correspondence with Lazarus' theoretical concepts of appraisal and coping. Methods: Thirteen women completed a demographic data sheet and participated in audiotaped interviews conducted by the nurse researcher. An interview guide was used to have the women describe their coping as they neared completion of a Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Content analysis was used to analyze the data for common elements and other ways of coping. Results: Analysis of interview data resulted in 6 common elements (those occurring in 7 or more of the women's interviews) and 4 other ways of coping with cardiac rehabilitation (those occurring in less than 7 of the women's interviews). The common elements were: managing external demands (home maintenance, family needs, work or social commitments, cost, transportation), perceiving benefit, perceiving support of family, health team, or work place, valuing cardiac rehabilitation, managing internal demands (challenges to physical, emotional, or psychological strength), and prioritizing self-care. Four other ways of coping were: demonstrating determination, managing chronic illness demands, illuminating perceptions, and developing ability to use exercise equipment. Further analysis revealed correspondence with appraisal and coping as theorized by Lazarus. Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study described ways of coping that provide a beginning foundation for developing interventions related to improving women's participation in cardiac rehabilitation. Interventions based on women's perspectives may improve cardiac rehabilitation participation and female patients' outcomes. Improving outcomes is integral to evidence-based nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:37Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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