2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163557
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Magnet Process and the Perceived Practice Environment of Nurses
Author(s):
Quinlan, Patricia; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Larson, Elaine L.; Pastor, Diane K.; Stone, Patricia W.
Author Details:
Patricia Quinlan, RN, MPA, Doctoral Student, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: pq2102@columbia.edu; Jeannie P. Cimiotti, RN, DNS; Elaine L. Larson, RN, PhD, CIC; Diane K. Pastor; Patricia W. Stone, RN, MPH, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The primary study aim is to compare the differences between organizational characteristics and nurses from hospitals at various stages of Magnet recognition divided among three categories: magnet hospitals, hospitals in the process of applying for magnet certification and non-magnet hospitals. Additionally, the study examined how nurses from the three categories perceived their work environment. Methods: In a national, cross-sectional survey of critical care nurses, the Perceived Nurse Work Environment (PNWE) instrument was administered to measure nurses' perceptions of their work environment. The PNWE is a psychometrically sound norm-referenced instrument comprised of seven subscales that measure nurse perceptions of organizational characteristics: Nurse/Physician Collaboration; Participatory Decision Making; Staffing/Resources; Positive Scheduling Climate; Nursing Leadership; Support for Professional Practice and Support for Clinical Competence. Organizational characteristics, nurse demographics and subscale data were analyzed using Chi-square, general linear regression models (GLM) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons tests. Results: Data were available from 2,077 nurse surveys. The majority of nurses were female (90%), from large hospitals in the Atlantic region (42%). The mean age of a nurse was 39.5 (SE 0.41) years with 10.2 (SE 0.36) years of work experience in the intensive care unit. Higher nurse scores were significantly (all p values < 0.05) associated with magnet certification on three subscales of the PNWE (governance, training and a positive scheduling climate). Nurses from hospitals in the magnet application process had consistently lower scores when compared to nurses from magnet and non-magnet hospitals. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses from magnet hospitals had a high perception of their work environment for governance, training and positive scheduling climate. Further research is necessary to determine why nurses from hospital in the magnet application process had a lower perception of their work environment and to determine if the characteristics of magnet hospitals have changed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Magnet Process and the Perceived Practice Environment of Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinlan, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCimiotti, Jeannie P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Elaine L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPastor, Diane K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Patricia W.en_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Quinlan, RN, MPA, Doctoral Student, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: pq2102@columbia.edu; Jeannie P. Cimiotti, RN, DNS; Elaine L. Larson, RN, PhD, CIC; Diane K. Pastor; Patricia W. Stone, RN, MPH, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163557-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The primary study aim is to compare the differences between organizational characteristics and nurses from hospitals at various stages of Magnet recognition divided among three categories: magnet hospitals, hospitals in the process of applying for magnet certification and non-magnet hospitals. Additionally, the study examined how nurses from the three categories perceived their work environment. Methods: In a national, cross-sectional survey of critical care nurses, the Perceived Nurse Work Environment (PNWE) instrument was administered to measure nurses' perceptions of their work environment. The PNWE is a psychometrically sound norm-referenced instrument comprised of seven subscales that measure nurse perceptions of organizational characteristics: Nurse/Physician Collaboration; Participatory Decision Making; Staffing/Resources; Positive Scheduling Climate; Nursing Leadership; Support for Professional Practice and Support for Clinical Competence. Organizational characteristics, nurse demographics and subscale data were analyzed using Chi-square, general linear regression models (GLM) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons tests. Results: Data were available from 2,077 nurse surveys. The majority of nurses were female (90%), from large hospitals in the Atlantic region (42%). The mean age of a nurse was 39.5 (SE 0.41) years with 10.2 (SE 0.36) years of work experience in the intensive care unit. Higher nurse scores were significantly (all p values < 0.05) associated with magnet certification on three subscales of the PNWE (governance, training and a positive scheduling climate). Nurses from hospitals in the magnet application process had consistently lower scores when compared to nurses from magnet and non-magnet hospitals. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses from magnet hospitals had a high perception of their work environment for governance, training and positive scheduling climate. Further research is necessary to determine why nurses from hospital in the magnet application process had a lower perception of their work environment and to determine if the characteristics of magnet hospitals have changed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:38Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.