Relationship of Body Mass Index to Barriers to Exercise, Mood, Diet Self Efficacy, Self Esteem, and Ability to Perform Physical Activities in African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163559
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Body Mass Index to Barriers to Exercise, Mood, Diet Self Efficacy, Self Esteem, and Ability to Perform Physical Activities in African American Women
Author(s):
Reeder, Sara; Pickett, Mary; Lupinacci, Paul
Author Details:
Sara Reeder, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, email: sara.reeder@villanova.edu; Mary Pickett, PhD, RN; Paul Lupinacci, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in America. Moreover, the prevalence of overweight/obesity is 66% higher in African American (AA) women than white women. The cause of the rising prevalence of obesity in AA women remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mood, barriers to exercise (BTE), diet self-efficacy (DS-E), self-esteem (S-E), and physical activities in AA women. Methods: AA women recruited from three churches and a mother's group were surveyed using the BTE Scale, Center for Epidemiological Scale for Depression (CESD), DS-E Scale, Rosenberg S-E Scale, and the physical activities subscale (MOS-SF 36). Women were categorized into 3 groups using standard BMI group criteria (normal < 25 kg/m2, overweight between 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2, and obese > 30 kg/m2.) Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons, and logistic regression procedures. Results: A voluntary sample of 69 AA women was obtained. The average age of respondents was 46.7 years (SD=12.9). Most (68%) of the women were overweight or obese. Mean BMI and BTE were 28.38 and 61.22, respectively. Obese women had a significantly lower score on the BTE scale than normal and overweight women (57, p=.002). Regression to predict BMI indicated an odds ratio of 0.77 for S-E and overweight (95% CI (0.59, 99). Overall, three variables including DS-E (r = 0.31, p = .009), SE (r = -0.79, p = .001), physical activity (r = 0.28, p = .001) were correlated with mood (CESD). Significant correlations were found between DS-E and mood in the obese group (r = -0.44, p = .003). Conclusions and Implications: Overweight and obese AA women had positive self-esteem and mood levels. Obese women reported fewer BTE. Interventions designed to emphasize the important health benefits associated with exercise and physical activity need to be developed in order to assist obese and overweight AA women to reduce BMI to healthier levels.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Body Mass Index to Barriers to Exercise, Mood, Diet Self Efficacy, Self Esteem, and Ability to Perform Physical Activities in African American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReeder, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPickett, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorLupinacci, Paulen_US
dc.author.detailsSara Reeder, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, email: sara.reeder@villanova.edu; Mary Pickett, PhD, RN; Paul Lupinacci, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163559-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in America. Moreover, the prevalence of overweight/obesity is 66% higher in African American (AA) women than white women. The cause of the rising prevalence of obesity in AA women remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mood, barriers to exercise (BTE), diet self-efficacy (DS-E), self-esteem (S-E), and physical activities in AA women. Methods: AA women recruited from three churches and a mother's group were surveyed using the BTE Scale, Center for Epidemiological Scale for Depression (CESD), DS-E Scale, Rosenberg S-E Scale, and the physical activities subscale (MOS-SF 36). Women were categorized into 3 groups using standard BMI group criteria (normal < 25 kg/m2, overweight between 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2, and obese > 30 kg/m2.) Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons, and logistic regression procedures. Results: A voluntary sample of 69 AA women was obtained. The average age of respondents was 46.7 years (SD=12.9). Most (68%) of the women were overweight or obese. Mean BMI and BTE were 28.38 and 61.22, respectively. Obese women had a significantly lower score on the BTE scale than normal and overweight women (57, p=.002). Regression to predict BMI indicated an odds ratio of 0.77 for S-E and overweight (95% CI (0.59, 99). Overall, three variables including DS-E (r = 0.31, p = .009), SE (r = -0.79, p = .001), physical activity (r = 0.28, p = .001) were correlated with mood (CESD). Significant correlations were found between DS-E and mood in the obese group (r = -0.44, p = .003). Conclusions and Implications: Overweight and obese AA women had positive self-esteem and mood levels. Obese women reported fewer BTE. Interventions designed to emphasize the important health benefits associated with exercise and physical activity need to be developed in order to assist obese and overweight AA women to reduce BMI to healthier levels.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:40Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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