2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163567
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of disability following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage
Author(s):
Sherwood, Paula; Kong, Yuan; Kerr, Mary; Yonas, Howard
Author Details:
Paula Sherwood, RN, PhD, CNRN, Research Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: prs11@pitt.edu; Yuan Kong, MS; Mary Kerr, RN, PhD, FAAN; Howard Yonas, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Although research has shown sociodemographic characteristics to affect disability after diseases such as ischemic stroke and cancer, their role in disability after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how age, gender, income, race, time from injury to treatment, Hunt and Hess (HH), and Fisher score affect disability after SAH. Methods: A total of 230 patients with SAH were recruited from an ongoing NIH funded study (#RO1NR04339). Patients 18-75 years old with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm admitted to a neurovascular ICU with a HH score of > 2 and/or Fisher score > 1 were included. Patient disability was determined by phone or face-to-face interview at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after discharge using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Barthel Index, Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) and SF-36, physical function subscale. Income was estimated by zip code using median population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Time from injury to treatment was number of hours from initial symptom to first time examined in a hospital. Analyses utilized mixed models and generalized equation estimation methods. Results: HH predicted all disability measures (p=.002 for GOS, Barthel, and MRS; p=.03 for SF36). Time from injury to treatment significantly affected GOS (p=.05) and Barthel (p=.01), with trends in MRS and SF36 (p=.06 for both). Age (p=.03) and race (p=.05) significantly predicted SF36 only. There was no significant direct effect of marital status on disability. There was a significant interaction effect of divorce by time on the SF36 (p=.03), with trends in GOS (p=.09), MRS (p=.06), and Barthel (p=.07). Gender, income, and Fisher score did not affect any disability measure. Conclusions and Implications: Findings underscore the need to decrease system barriers and improve time to treatment, and suggest chronic stress such as divorce may affect recovery from illness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of disability following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, Yuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorYonas, Howarden_US
dc.author.detailsPaula Sherwood, RN, PhD, CNRN, Research Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: prs11@pitt.edu; Yuan Kong, MS; Mary Kerr, RN, PhD, FAAN; Howard Yonas, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163567-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although research has shown sociodemographic characteristics to affect disability after diseases such as ischemic stroke and cancer, their role in disability after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how age, gender, income, race, time from injury to treatment, Hunt and Hess (HH), and Fisher score affect disability after SAH. Methods: A total of 230 patients with SAH were recruited from an ongoing NIH funded study (#RO1NR04339). Patients 18-75 years old with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm admitted to a neurovascular ICU with a HH score of > 2 and/or Fisher score > 1 were included. Patient disability was determined by phone or face-to-face interview at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after discharge using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Barthel Index, Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) and SF-36, physical function subscale. Income was estimated by zip code using median population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Time from injury to treatment was number of hours from initial symptom to first time examined in a hospital. Analyses utilized mixed models and generalized equation estimation methods. Results: HH predicted all disability measures (p=.002 for GOS, Barthel, and MRS; p=.03 for SF36). Time from injury to treatment significantly affected GOS (p=.05) and Barthel (p=.01), with trends in MRS and SF36 (p=.06 for both). Age (p=.03) and race (p=.05) significantly predicted SF36 only. There was no significant direct effect of marital status on disability. There was a significant interaction effect of divorce by time on the SF36 (p=.03), with trends in GOS (p=.09), MRS (p=.06), and Barthel (p=.07). Gender, income, and Fisher score did not affect any disability measure. Conclusions and Implications: Findings underscore the need to decrease system barriers and improve time to treatment, and suggest chronic stress such as divorce may affect recovery from illness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:48Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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