2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163568
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychiatric Hospitalization Among Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Author(s):
Smaldone, Arlene; Honig, Judy; Arons, Raymond; Weinger, Katie
Author Details:
Arlene Smaldone, DNSc, CPNP, CDE, Postdoctoral Fellow, Joslin Diabetes Center, Behavioral Research, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Arlene.smaldone@joslin.harvard.edu; Judy Honig, EdD, CPNP; Raymond Arons, DPH; Katie Weinger, EdD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Comorbid psychiatric issues are an important problem for children with type 1 diabetes. However, the prevalence of severe psychiatric problems requiring hospitalization is not known. Furthermore, the association of psychiatric hospitalization with poorly controlled diabetes is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of psychiatric hospitalizations among children hospitalized with poorly controlled diabetes. Methods: To examine psychiatric hospitalizations, we first identified 2,193 children (0-18 years old) with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes defined as having > 1 episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (ICD-9-code 250.11) using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development hospital discharge data set for years 1998 to 2000. We used record linkage number (RLN) to group children by severity of illness (1,694 children with single versus 499 children with multiple DKA hospitalizations). We used RLN and ICD-9 codes (290.0-319.0) to identify psychiatric hospitalizations for these children. Results: Eighty-two children (12.4 cases/1,000 person years, 95% CI 9.9-15.5/1,000 person years) were hospitalized for psychiatric illness during 1998-2000 (160 hospitalizations). This is much higher than that reported in the general pediatric population (1.7 cases/1,000 person years). Further, children with multiple DKA were 2.4 times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric illness than children with single DKA (95% CI 1.6-3.7, p< 0.001). Twenty-nine children (35%) had more than one psychiatric hospitalization. Depression was the most frequent reason for psychiatric hospitalization (62%). Other reasons for admission were oppositional/conduct disorder (17%), bipolar disorder (8%) and alcohol/drug abuse (5%). Conclusions and Implications: Children hospitalized with poorly controlled diabetes are at increased risk of psychiatric hospitalization compared to the general pediatric population, with those having multiple DKA at highest risk. Routine care of children with type 1 diabetes, particularly those with recurrent DKA, must include ongoing screening, early identification, and treatment for depression and other psychiatric issues.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychiatric Hospitalization Among Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmaldone, Arleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHonig, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorArons, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.authorWeinger, Katieen_US
dc.author.detailsArlene Smaldone, DNSc, CPNP, CDE, Postdoctoral Fellow, Joslin Diabetes Center, Behavioral Research, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Arlene.smaldone@joslin.harvard.edu; Judy Honig, EdD, CPNP; Raymond Arons, DPH; Katie Weinger, EdD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163568-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Comorbid psychiatric issues are an important problem for children with type 1 diabetes. However, the prevalence of severe psychiatric problems requiring hospitalization is not known. Furthermore, the association of psychiatric hospitalization with poorly controlled diabetes is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of psychiatric hospitalizations among children hospitalized with poorly controlled diabetes. Methods: To examine psychiatric hospitalizations, we first identified 2,193 children (0-18 years old) with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes defined as having > 1 episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (ICD-9-code 250.11) using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development hospital discharge data set for years 1998 to 2000. We used record linkage number (RLN) to group children by severity of illness (1,694 children with single versus 499 children with multiple DKA hospitalizations). We used RLN and ICD-9 codes (290.0-319.0) to identify psychiatric hospitalizations for these children. Results: Eighty-two children (12.4 cases/1,000 person years, 95% CI 9.9-15.5/1,000 person years) were hospitalized for psychiatric illness during 1998-2000 (160 hospitalizations). This is much higher than that reported in the general pediatric population (1.7 cases/1,000 person years). Further, children with multiple DKA were 2.4 times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric illness than children with single DKA (95% CI 1.6-3.7, p< 0.001). Twenty-nine children (35%) had more than one psychiatric hospitalization. Depression was the most frequent reason for psychiatric hospitalization (62%). Other reasons for admission were oppositional/conduct disorder (17%), bipolar disorder (8%) and alcohol/drug abuse (5%). Conclusions and Implications: Children hospitalized with poorly controlled diabetes are at increased risk of psychiatric hospitalization compared to the general pediatric population, with those having multiple DKA at highest risk. Routine care of children with type 1 diabetes, particularly those with recurrent DKA, must include ongoing screening, early identification, and treatment for depression and other psychiatric issues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:50Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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