2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163569
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Patient Experience of Communication and Being ôKnownö by Providers
Author(s):
Somerville, Jacqueline
Author Details:
Jacqueline Somerville, RN, MS, Associate Chief Nurse, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: jsomerville@partners.org
Abstract:
To date there has been significant research completed on the concept of "knowing" the patient (Swanson, 1991, Jenny & Logan, 1992, Radwin, 1994 ). With growing changes introduced into today's health care settings this important concept can easily be lost. Purpose: The goal of this research study was to identify core themes that reflect the experience of being "known" by nurses and other providers in a surgical inpatient acute care setting within the context of the many challenges faced in the current healthcare environment including competing demands for limited resources, decreased length of stay, increased patient acuity and implementation of the 80-hour work rule for physicians in training. The specific aims of this research were to understand how patients perceive being known by nurses and other providers so that the hospitalization experience could be enhanced. Methods: Participants consisted of a convenience sample of surgical inpatients that participated in a semi-structure interviewed between twenty and sixty minutes. A qualitative, descriptive-exploratory method was used to analyze the data. The researcher conducted all interviews, tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis was used to analyze the data and themes were identified. Findings: There were seventeen participants in the study, ranging between 34 and 84 with a mean age of 57 years. The data revealed four themes which included: being known was perceived by patients to impact their sense of feeling safe, empowered to engage in their care and their overall sense of being cared for; active listening on the behalf of providers was essential to this knowing process; and threats to "being known " were perceived by patients to increase anxiety and uncertainty. Conclusions and Implications: Being "known" contributes to patients' perception of excellence in individualized care and a sense of feeling safe and empowered. Removing threats to being known is essential to quality, safe and effective patient centered care. Nursing must continue to focus on the human experience of health and illness during provider encounters. Redesigning patient care environments is essential if we are to incorporate patients and their families as active participants in the care delivery experience. Creating opportunities for improved communication and continuity are needed to insure optimal patient outcomes. Nursing is critical to the process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Patient Experience of Communication and Being ôKnownö by Providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSomerville, Jacquelineen_US
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Somerville, RN, MS, Associate Chief Nurse, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: jsomerville@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163569-
dc.description.abstractTo date there has been significant research completed on the concept of "knowing" the patient (Swanson, 1991, Jenny & Logan, 1992, Radwin, 1994 ). With growing changes introduced into today's health care settings this important concept can easily be lost. Purpose: The goal of this research study was to identify core themes that reflect the experience of being "known" by nurses and other providers in a surgical inpatient acute care setting within the context of the many challenges faced in the current healthcare environment including competing demands for limited resources, decreased length of stay, increased patient acuity and implementation of the 80-hour work rule for physicians in training. The specific aims of this research were to understand how patients perceive being known by nurses and other providers so that the hospitalization experience could be enhanced. Methods: Participants consisted of a convenience sample of surgical inpatients that participated in a semi-structure interviewed between twenty and sixty minutes. A qualitative, descriptive-exploratory method was used to analyze the data. The researcher conducted all interviews, tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis was used to analyze the data and themes were identified. Findings: There were seventeen participants in the study, ranging between 34 and 84 with a mean age of 57 years. The data revealed four themes which included: being known was perceived by patients to impact their sense of feeling safe, empowered to engage in their care and their overall sense of being cared for; active listening on the behalf of providers was essential to this knowing process; and threats to "being known " were perceived by patients to increase anxiety and uncertainty. Conclusions and Implications: Being "known" contributes to patients' perception of excellence in individualized care and a sense of feeling safe and empowered. Removing threats to being known is essential to quality, safe and effective patient centered care. Nursing must continue to focus on the human experience of health and illness during provider encounters. Redesigning patient care environments is essential if we are to incorporate patients and their families as active participants in the care delivery experience. Creating opportunities for improved communication and continuity are needed to insure optimal patient outcomes. Nursing is critical to the process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:51Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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