2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163570
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Brain Anatomy & Visual Motor Integration in Preterm Children
Author(s):
Sullivan, Mary; Hawes, Katheleen; Cassese, John A.
Author Details:
Mary Sullivan, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: mcsullivan@uri.edu; Katheleen Hawes, MS, RN; John A. Cassese, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Neuroimaging studies in preterm children have identified brain structure abnormalities, decreased white matter, and increased ventricular size. Empirical validity is lacking to support how ubiquitous preterm motor problems are related to brain structure in children who experienced hypoxic-ischemic perinatal morbidities. The purpose was to compare brain anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with visual motor integration and kinematic performance in children. Methods: Seventeen children (7 full-term, 10 preterm) representing two cohorts born a decade apart (1980s, 1990s) completed visual-motor testing using the Beery VMI and kinematics in a pre-MRI session, followed by imaging in a 1.5 Tesla scanner. The kinematic analysis, precisely measuring the position of the moving limb in 3-dimensional space, used a 2-choice visual discrimination task. Pokemon images were presented in 4 blocks of 25 trials where the child reached toward 1 of 2 response buttons located approximately 25 cm away. During the 7- minute high resolution structural scan, the child viewed a movie via an angled mirror on a back projection screen. Whole brain, ventricular size, white matter, and corpus collosum and were classified. Results: Beery VMI scores were lower for the preterm compared to the full-term children with older children (birthdates 1980s) having poorer scores than the younger (birthdates 1990s). Trends (p< .10) for the kinematic data suggest that the greater visual-cognitive load may compromise implementation of the reach. In the T1 weighted and axial T2 weighted images, 5 of 17 (29%) brain scans were not normal, of these 3 (60%) were older preterms and 2 (40%) were younger. Thinning corpus collosum was the most common finding. Conclusions and Implications: Improved neonatal technology in a decade has increased preterm survival but problems in subtle motor movement and visual motor domains continue. This study is a new application of kinematic and MRI methods. Morphometric and functional MRI approaches may reveal more discrete differences in preterm children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Sponsors:
Funding support from Grant # 5 P20 RR 016457 from NCRR-NIH Brown MR Center Ittleson Flexible Research Fund.
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBrain Anatomy & Visual Motor Integration in Preterm Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorHawes, Katheleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCassese, John A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMary Sullivan, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: mcsullivan@uri.edu; Katheleen Hawes, MS, RN; John A. Cassese, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163570-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Neuroimaging studies in preterm children have identified brain structure abnormalities, decreased white matter, and increased ventricular size. Empirical validity is lacking to support how ubiquitous preterm motor problems are related to brain structure in children who experienced hypoxic-ischemic perinatal morbidities. The purpose was to compare brain anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with visual motor integration and kinematic performance in children. Methods: Seventeen children (7 full-term, 10 preterm) representing two cohorts born a decade apart (1980s, 1990s) completed visual-motor testing using the Beery VMI and kinematics in a pre-MRI session, followed by imaging in a 1.5 Tesla scanner. The kinematic analysis, precisely measuring the position of the moving limb in 3-dimensional space, used a 2-choice visual discrimination task. Pokemon images were presented in 4 blocks of 25 trials where the child reached toward 1 of 2 response buttons located approximately 25 cm away. During the 7- minute high resolution structural scan, the child viewed a movie via an angled mirror on a back projection screen. Whole brain, ventricular size, white matter, and corpus collosum and were classified. Results: Beery VMI scores were lower for the preterm compared to the full-term children with older children (birthdates 1980s) having poorer scores than the younger (birthdates 1990s). Trends (p< .10) for the kinematic data suggest that the greater visual-cognitive load may compromise implementation of the reach. In the T1 weighted and axial T2 weighted images, 5 of 17 (29%) brain scans were not normal, of these 3 (60%) were older preterms and 2 (40%) were younger. Thinning corpus collosum was the most common finding. Conclusions and Implications: Improved neonatal technology in a decade has increased preterm survival but problems in subtle motor movement and visual motor domains continue. This study is a new application of kinematic and MRI methods. Morphometric and functional MRI approaches may reveal more discrete differences in preterm children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:52Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding support from Grant # 5 P20 RR 016457 from NCRR-NIH Brown MR Center Ittleson Flexible Research Fund.en_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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