Academic Microsystems: Measuring student nurse sensitive outcomes in a community-based initiative using the Clinical Microsystems evaluation meth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163574
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Academic Microsystems: Measuring student nurse sensitive outcomes in a community-based initiative using the Clinical Microsystems evaluation meth
Author(s):
Thies, Kathleen; Ayers, Lea
Author Details:
Kathleen Thies, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Director, Graduate Entry Pathway, University of Massachusetts Worcester Graduate School of Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: Kathleen.Thies@umassmed.edu; Lea Ayers, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: In the Community Capstone of the new community-based baccalaureate curriculum at Colby-Sawyer College, senior nursing students' initiatives have addressed social isolation among elders and violence at a high school, among other community health needs. The challenge was to use an evaluation method that would capture the following data: a) the learner outcomes for students and the student nurse-sensitive health outcomes for the community, b) the parallel academic and community processes (ie, units of activity) that led to those outcomes, c) the structure required to support the processes in both the academic and community settings, and d) the effectiveness of the partnership between the nursing program and the host community agencies. Methods: We chose to adapt the Clinical Microsystems evaluation model to measure structure, processes, and outcomes in both the academic and community systems. Developed by the Center for Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) at Dartmouth Medical School, the model is used in clinical systems for the purpose of continuous quality improvement. The centerpiece is the Clinical Value Compass, which captures data related to clinical/functional status, expectations/satisfaction and costs, both before and after intervening clinical (or in this case academic) activities. Results: Questions posed at 12 key points in the model captured data related to: 1) the skills students developed; 2) how students' educational needs were met; 3) how community's service/clinical needs were met; 4) expectations/satisfaction regarding the partnership between college and community agency; 5) costs in time and money for both partners; 6) motivation/capacity for the partnership. Implications: We demonstrated how undergraduate students effected community health outcomes through sustainable partnerships with community agencies, outcomes that would otherwise not have been addressed without their intervention. Academic Microsystems has promise as a robust evaluation model for the contributions of academic nursing to meeting the needs of the community.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcademic Microsystems: Measuring student nurse sensitive outcomes in a community-based initiative using the Clinical Microsystems evaluation methen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThies, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorAyers, Leaen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Thies, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Director, Graduate Entry Pathway, University of Massachusetts Worcester Graduate School of Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: Kathleen.Thies@umassmed.edu; Lea Ayers, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163574-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: In the Community Capstone of the new community-based baccalaureate curriculum at Colby-Sawyer College, senior nursing students' initiatives have addressed social isolation among elders and violence at a high school, among other community health needs. The challenge was to use an evaluation method that would capture the following data: a) the learner outcomes for students and the student nurse-sensitive health outcomes for the community, b) the parallel academic and community processes (ie, units of activity) that led to those outcomes, c) the structure required to support the processes in both the academic and community settings, and d) the effectiveness of the partnership between the nursing program and the host community agencies. Methods: We chose to adapt the Clinical Microsystems evaluation model to measure structure, processes, and outcomes in both the academic and community systems. Developed by the Center for Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS) at Dartmouth Medical School, the model is used in clinical systems for the purpose of continuous quality improvement. The centerpiece is the Clinical Value Compass, which captures data related to clinical/functional status, expectations/satisfaction and costs, both before and after intervening clinical (or in this case academic) activities. Results: Questions posed at 12 key points in the model captured data related to: 1) the skills students developed; 2) how students' educational needs were met; 3) how community's service/clinical needs were met; 4) expectations/satisfaction regarding the partnership between college and community agency; 5) costs in time and money for both partners; 6) motivation/capacity for the partnership. Implications: We demonstrated how undergraduate students effected community health outcomes through sustainable partnerships with community agencies, outcomes that would otherwise not have been addressed without their intervention. Academic Microsystems has promise as a robust evaluation model for the contributions of academic nursing to meeting the needs of the community.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:56Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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