2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163575
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale
Author(s):
Vessey, Judy; Andrews Horowitz, June; Duffy, Mary
Author Details:
Judy Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN, Lelia Holden Carroll Professor in Nursing, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: Vessey@bc.edu; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, FAAN; Mary Duffy, PhD, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Over 10% of children experience chronic teasing/bullying and are at risk for psychological and physical sequelae. This presentation reports the findings of a multi-site, multi- method, methodological study, the CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing scale, designed to identify at-risk, middle school youth. Methods: The sample was 618 youths, aged 11-14 years; 53% female; 73% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African American and 6.5% other racial/ethnic heritage, from five geographically diverse states. Focus groups were conducted to ascertain four teasing domains. Using these findings, the CATS was designed, pilot-tested, and then administered to subjects. Results: Seventy items were derived to measure the four major constructs underpinning the CATS: a) Physical Appearance (n=18), b) Personality & Behavior (n=17), c) Family & Environment (n=17), and d) School (n=18). The computed Cronbach's alpha was .95. Only items with item-total correlations > .50 were retained for subsequent analyses. The 32 retained CATS items were subjected to principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization. Eight initial factors with eigenvalues > 1 emerged, accounting for 65.2% of variance. A four-factor solution was then specified and accounted for 51.2% of variance. Factor 1, Personality & Behavior Teasing (n=14; Cronbach's alpha, .91), explained 18.4% of variance; Factor 2, School-Related Teasing (n=9; Cronbach's alpha, .84); explained 12.4%; Factor 3, Family & Environment Teasing (n=7; Cronbach's alpha, .84) accounted for 11.8% of variance; and Factor 4, Physical Size Teasing (n=2; Cronbach's alpha, .85) accounted for 8.6% of variance. Conclusions and Implications: The 32-item CATS subscales demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reliability and construct (factorial) validity for use in subsequent research with middle-school children. Screening at-risk youths in practice will help ensure that early interventions are initiated. The availability of a screening instrument for teasing can help shape school health policies around identification of high-risk youths.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing Scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVessey, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrews Horowitz, Juneen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsJudy Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN, Lelia Holden Carroll Professor in Nursing, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: Vessey@bc.edu; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, FAAN; Mary Duffy, PhD, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163575-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Over 10% of children experience chronic teasing/bullying and are at risk for psychological and physical sequelae. This presentation reports the findings of a multi-site, multi- method, methodological study, the CATS: Child-Adolescent Teasing scale, designed to identify at-risk, middle school youth. Methods: The sample was 618 youths, aged 11-14 years; 53% female; 73% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African American and 6.5% other racial/ethnic heritage, from five geographically diverse states. Focus groups were conducted to ascertain four teasing domains. Using these findings, the CATS was designed, pilot-tested, and then administered to subjects. Results: Seventy items were derived to measure the four major constructs underpinning the CATS: a) Physical Appearance (n=18), b) Personality & Behavior (n=17), c) Family & Environment (n=17), and d) School (n=18). The computed Cronbach's alpha was .95. Only items with item-total correlations > .50 were retained for subsequent analyses. The 32 retained CATS items were subjected to principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization. Eight initial factors with eigenvalues > 1 emerged, accounting for 65.2% of variance. A four-factor solution was then specified and accounted for 51.2% of variance. Factor 1, Personality & Behavior Teasing (n=14; Cronbach's alpha, .91), explained 18.4% of variance; Factor 2, School-Related Teasing (n=9; Cronbach's alpha, .84); explained 12.4%; Factor 3, Family & Environment Teasing (n=7; Cronbach's alpha, .84) accounted for 11.8% of variance; and Factor 4, Physical Size Teasing (n=2; Cronbach's alpha, .85) accounted for 8.6% of variance. Conclusions and Implications: The 32-item CATS subscales demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reliability and construct (factorial) validity for use in subsequent research with middle-school children. Screening at-risk youths in practice will help ensure that early interventions are initiated. The availability of a screening instrument for teasing can help shape school health policies around identification of high-risk youths.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:09:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:09:57Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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