Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Rural Female Adolescents: Knowledge, Contraception, and Sexual Risk Behaviors.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163577
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Rural Female Adolescents: Knowledge, Contraception, and Sexual Risk Behaviors.
Author(s):
Wang, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Wang, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, West Virginia University, School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: jwang@wvu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine (a) knowledge about HPV and contraception, (b) attitudes toward contraception, and (c) sexual risk and contraceptive behaviors among adolescent females in a rural, Appalachian population. Method: The sample consisted of 159 adolescent females recruited from three (3) high schools in one county in an Appalachian state. The subjects completed a questionnaire, with items that measured knowledge about HPV, other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and contraception; attitudes toward contraception; use of contraception and level of risk in sexual behavior; and items that provided demographic data. Results: The majority of the respondents were not aware of the ease of obtaining sexual protection devices against STDs; about 10% of respondents did not know that STDs are best prevented by using condoms. Approximately 64% (n = 102) of respondents reported having had sexual intercourse and, of this group, 71% (n = 67) stated that they had sex during the past month. At least 20% of respondents were not aware that withdrawal is the least effective method of birth control among the choices given. Almost 67% of respondents answered that there is a cure for HPV; however, 33% knew that "It is impossible to cure HPV", and 44% responded that there is no cure for syphilis, gonorrhea, HPV or vaginitis. Girls living with both parents appeared to have less HPV knowledge than those living only with father; only with mother; or with other relatives. Those respondents who were living with both biological parents were more likely not to engage in sexual activities than were those with other arrangements (55% vs. 77%). A higher level of HPV knowledge significantly predicted endorsement of the importance of birth control. Conclusions: Rural female adolescents lack knowledge related to HPV, other STDs, and contraception, with the more sexually active displaying more knowledge than the less active in the Appalachian population studied. Fewer sexual risk behaviors were encountered among adolescents who lived with both parents, whether knowledge level was high or low.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman Papillomavirus (HPV) in Rural Female Adolescents: Knowledge, Contraception, and Sexual Risk Behaviors.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Wang, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, West Virginia University, School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: jwang@wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163577-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine (a) knowledge about HPV and contraception, (b) attitudes toward contraception, and (c) sexual risk and contraceptive behaviors among adolescent females in a rural, Appalachian population. Method: The sample consisted of 159 adolescent females recruited from three (3) high schools in one county in an Appalachian state. The subjects completed a questionnaire, with items that measured knowledge about HPV, other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and contraception; attitudes toward contraception; use of contraception and level of risk in sexual behavior; and items that provided demographic data. Results: The majority of the respondents were not aware of the ease of obtaining sexual protection devices against STDs; about 10% of respondents did not know that STDs are best prevented by using condoms. Approximately 64% (n = 102) of respondents reported having had sexual intercourse and, of this group, 71% (n = 67) stated that they had sex during the past month. At least 20% of respondents were not aware that withdrawal is the least effective method of birth control among the choices given. Almost 67% of respondents answered that there is a cure for HPV; however, 33% knew that "It is impossible to cure HPV", and 44% responded that there is no cure for syphilis, gonorrhea, HPV or vaginitis. Girls living with both parents appeared to have less HPV knowledge than those living only with father; only with mother; or with other relatives. Those respondents who were living with both biological parents were more likely not to engage in sexual activities than were those with other arrangements (55% vs. 77%). A higher level of HPV knowledge significantly predicted endorsement of the importance of birth control. Conclusions: Rural female adolescents lack knowledge related to HPV, other STDs, and contraception, with the more sexually active displaying more knowledge than the less active in the Appalachian population studied. Fewer sexual risk behaviors were encountered among adolescents who lived with both parents, whether knowledge level was high or low.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:00Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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