The Risk of Cardiac Events in Post-Menopausal Women Experiencing Psychological Stress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163578
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Risk of Cardiac Events in Post-Menopausal Women Experiencing Psychological Stress
Author(s):
Wassef, Maureen; Howland, Lois C.; Miller, Kathleen; Crawford, Sybil
Author Details:
Maureen Wassef, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Worcester, Graduate School of Nursing, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, USA, email: Maureen.Wassef@umassmed.edu; Lois C. Howland, DrPH, RN; Kathleen Miller, EdD, RN; Sybil Crawford, Ph.D
Abstract:
Purpose: Heart disease is the number one killer of post-menopausal women in the United States. Due to recent studies documenting an increase in cardiac reactivity to stress in the post- menopausal population, psychological stress has been emphasized as a potential cardiac risk factor for these women. The specific aims of this research study focus on identifying the role of psychological stress as a risk factor for cardiac events in post-menopausal women. Methods: Utilizing the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman's Stress, Appraisal and Coping, a secondary analysis was conducted on post-menopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Study at the University of Massachusetts Worcester Clinical Site. The use of a pooled logistic regression was utilized to analyze the relationship between the perception of stressful life events (SLE) and the occurrence of cardiac events within a 12-month period. Results: A sample of 1,829 post-menopausal women (mean age = 63) with no previous history of heart disease was analyzed. The total number of SLE did not predict an increase risk for cardiac events. The individual reports of the SLE of death/illness of a friend (p< .01) and incidence of physical/verbal abuse (p< .01) each predicted an increased risk of cardiac events in this sample of post-menopausal women, after controlling for confounding variables (age, high cholesterol, smoking, hypertension and diabetes). Conclusions and Nursing Implications: The results of this study have highlighted the importance of perceived SLE and the cardiac health of post- menopausal women. The death/illness of a friend and physical/verbal abuse have emerged as key stressors affecting the health of these women. An increased awareness/focus on the impact of these particular stressors in nursing assessment is crucial as well as further examination of the theoretical pathways between stress and cardiac health in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Risk of Cardiac Events in Post-Menopausal Women Experiencing Psychological Stressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWassef, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowland, Lois C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Sybilen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Wassef, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Worcester, Graduate School of Nursing, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, USA, email: Maureen.Wassef@umassmed.edu; Lois C. Howland, DrPH, RN; Kathleen Miller, EdD, RN; Sybil Crawford, Ph.Den_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163578-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Heart disease is the number one killer of post-menopausal women in the United States. Due to recent studies documenting an increase in cardiac reactivity to stress in the post- menopausal population, psychological stress has been emphasized as a potential cardiac risk factor for these women. The specific aims of this research study focus on identifying the role of psychological stress as a risk factor for cardiac events in post-menopausal women. Methods: Utilizing the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman's Stress, Appraisal and Coping, a secondary analysis was conducted on post-menopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Study at the University of Massachusetts Worcester Clinical Site. The use of a pooled logistic regression was utilized to analyze the relationship between the perception of stressful life events (SLE) and the occurrence of cardiac events within a 12-month period. Results: A sample of 1,829 post-menopausal women (mean age = 63) with no previous history of heart disease was analyzed. The total number of SLE did not predict an increase risk for cardiac events. The individual reports of the SLE of death/illness of a friend (p< .01) and incidence of physical/verbal abuse (p< .01) each predicted an increased risk of cardiac events in this sample of post-menopausal women, after controlling for confounding variables (age, high cholesterol, smoking, hypertension and diabetes). Conclusions and Nursing Implications: The results of this study have highlighted the importance of perceived SLE and the cardiac health of post- menopausal women. The death/illness of a friend and physical/verbal abuse have emerged as key stressors affecting the health of these women. An increased awareness/focus on the impact of these particular stressors in nursing assessment is crucial as well as further examination of the theoretical pathways between stress and cardiac health in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:01Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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