2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163580
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sensations of Urine Flow in People with Long-term Urinary Catheters
Author(s):
Wilde, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Wilde, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Turners Falls, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Little is known about how to prevent blockage and urinary tract infection (UTI) for people with long-term (over 4 months) indwelling urinary catheters. Despite practitioners efforts to limit their use, indwelling catheters are necessary for some individuals with neurogenic bladder and in select cases of incontinence. The specific aims were to: (a) Identify bodily sensations and daily catheter care practices related to urine flow; (b) Analyze the relationships between urine flow, fluid intake, catheter blockage, and UTI; and (c) Describe how UTI (in the past 12 months) was experienced. Methods: This community-based exploratory and descriptive study was conducted in participants' homes in North Carolina, October 2002-June 2003. The sample included 21 males and 9 females, aged 23-96 years, and almost half were of minority groups. Three-day fluid intake and urinary diary data were collected, followed by face-to-face tape-recorded interviews related to catheter experiences and practices. Analysis of data involved descriptive statistics and content analysis of narrative data. Results: While urine flow frequently was disrupted by urinary calculi (sediment) or kinks in tubing, UTI was significantly related only to traumatic catheter manipulations or catheter blockage. Catheter problems associated with UTI included: (1) "rough" catheter insertions (Chi sq. 10.62, p. 005 df 2); (2) "difficult" insertions (Chi Sq. 7.05, p. 029, df 2); and (3) catheter blockage (Chi sq. 8.62, p. 013, df 2. Though individuals had different ideas about what contributed to UTI, most had developed their own ways of paying attention to sensations and practices related to urine flow. Conclusions and Implications: Self-monitoring of urine flow may help prevent episodes of UTI through careful attention to catheter position and by preventing blockage. Further study is needed to understand more about the role of fluid intake and to determine more about what is causing traumatic catheter insertion.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSensations of Urine Flow in People with Long-term Urinary Cathetersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilde, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Wilde, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Turners Falls, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_wilde@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163580-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Little is known about how to prevent blockage and urinary tract infection (UTI) for people with long-term (over 4 months) indwelling urinary catheters. Despite practitioners efforts to limit their use, indwelling catheters are necessary for some individuals with neurogenic bladder and in select cases of incontinence. The specific aims were to: (a) Identify bodily sensations and daily catheter care practices related to urine flow; (b) Analyze the relationships between urine flow, fluid intake, catheter blockage, and UTI; and (c) Describe how UTI (in the past 12 months) was experienced. Methods: This community-based exploratory and descriptive study was conducted in participants' homes in North Carolina, October 2002-June 2003. The sample included 21 males and 9 females, aged 23-96 years, and almost half were of minority groups. Three-day fluid intake and urinary diary data were collected, followed by face-to-face tape-recorded interviews related to catheter experiences and practices. Analysis of data involved descriptive statistics and content analysis of narrative data. Results: While urine flow frequently was disrupted by urinary calculi (sediment) or kinks in tubing, UTI was significantly related only to traumatic catheter manipulations or catheter blockage. Catheter problems associated with UTI included: (1) "rough" catheter insertions (Chi sq. 10.62, p. 005 df 2); (2) "difficult" insertions (Chi Sq. 7.05, p. 029, df 2); and (3) catheter blockage (Chi sq. 8.62, p. 013, df 2. Though individuals had different ideas about what contributed to UTI, most had developed their own ways of paying attention to sensations and practices related to urine flow. Conclusions and Implications: Self-monitoring of urine flow may help prevent episodes of UTI through careful attention to catheter position and by preventing blockage. Further study is needed to understand more about the role of fluid intake and to determine more about what is causing traumatic catheter insertion.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:03Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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