2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163582
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing research priorities for 2002
Author(s):
Bayley, Elizabeth; MacLean, Susan; Desy, Pierre
Author Details:
Elizabeth Bayley, Broomall, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ebayley@aol.com; Susan MacLean; Pierre Desy
Abstract:
Purpose and Aim: Many beginning researchers have difficulty identifying topics for their research investigations. Seasoned researchers may be challenged to keep abreast of changing research priorities. Funding agencies use current priorities to focus resources on target populations. To determine today's critical nursing research priorities, a 3-round Delphi survey of emergency nurses was conducted. Methods and Framework: A convenience sample of 320 nurses involved in committee or leadership activities in the Emergency Nurses Association were asked to participate in this study. A group decision-making model was used to gain consensus on the research priorities. During Round 1, the nurses were asked to identify priorities for research. The investigators reviewed the 456 topics submitted by 147 nurses (46% response rate), synthesized similar ideas into 17 themes and 154 research questions. The Round II questionnaire contained 154 randomly ordered researchable questions and two 7-point Likert-type scales for rating the value for practicing nurses and the importance for consumers of health care. Higher ratings equal greater value or importance. For Round II, 101 nurses (68.7% response rate) rated 106 of the research questions greater than 5. These 106 questions were included in the Round III questionnaire. For each Round III question, the nurses were provided the group median score and their score from Round II, and asked to reflect on those ratings and again rate the research questions concerning value and importance. Round III was completed by 72 nurses (72% response rate). In Round III, 42 questions received ratings above 5.5. Results: The 5 highest ranked research priorities for practicing nurses included: optimum staff to patient ratios, effects of mandatory overtime, effects of overcrowding, effective strategies for educating and assuring competence of new nurses, and the impact of the nursing shortage on quality of care. The 5 highest ranked priorities of importance for consumers were: hospital boarding within the ED and patient outcomes, effective interventions for pain relief, effective discharge teaching methods, effects of holding patients in the ED, and techniques for reducing length of stay. Conclusions: The nurses' research priorities clearly reflected the changes that have taken place in the past few years in health care settings, especially staff downsizing, shortages of nurses, changes in staffing models, and overcrowding. The nurses' research priorities for patients also included evaluating the effects of operational changes on patient care and subsequent outcomes. Interventions for pain relief and discharge teaching continue to be important research priorities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing research priorities for 2002en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBayley, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacLean, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDesy, Pierreen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Bayley, Broomall, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ebayley@aol.com; Susan MacLean; Pierre Desyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163582-
dc.description.abstractPurpose and Aim: Many beginning researchers have difficulty identifying topics for their research investigations. Seasoned researchers may be challenged to keep abreast of changing research priorities. Funding agencies use current priorities to focus resources on target populations. To determine today's critical nursing research priorities, a 3-round Delphi survey of emergency nurses was conducted. Methods and Framework: A convenience sample of 320 nurses involved in committee or leadership activities in the Emergency Nurses Association were asked to participate in this study. A group decision-making model was used to gain consensus on the research priorities. During Round 1, the nurses were asked to identify priorities for research. The investigators reviewed the 456 topics submitted by 147 nurses (46% response rate), synthesized similar ideas into 17 themes and 154 research questions. The Round II questionnaire contained 154 randomly ordered researchable questions and two 7-point Likert-type scales for rating the value for practicing nurses and the importance for consumers of health care. Higher ratings equal greater value or importance. For Round II, 101 nurses (68.7% response rate) rated 106 of the research questions greater than 5. These 106 questions were included in the Round III questionnaire. For each Round III question, the nurses were provided the group median score and their score from Round II, and asked to reflect on those ratings and again rate the research questions concerning value and importance. Round III was completed by 72 nurses (72% response rate). In Round III, 42 questions received ratings above 5.5. Results: The 5 highest ranked research priorities for practicing nurses included: optimum staff to patient ratios, effects of mandatory overtime, effects of overcrowding, effective strategies for educating and assuring competence of new nurses, and the impact of the nursing shortage on quality of care. The 5 highest ranked priorities of importance for consumers were: hospital boarding within the ED and patient outcomes, effective interventions for pain relief, effective discharge teaching methods, effects of holding patients in the ED, and techniques for reducing length of stay. Conclusions: The nurses' research priorities clearly reflected the changes that have taken place in the past few years in health care settings, especially staff downsizing, shortages of nurses, changes in staffing models, and overcrowding. The nurses' research priorities for patients also included evaluating the effects of operational changes on patient care and subsequent outcomes. Interventions for pain relief and discharge teaching continue to be important research priorities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:05Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.