2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163583
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of the APOE allele on memory following traumatic brain injury (TBI)
Author(s):
Beatty, Megan; Kerr, Mary E.; Alexander, Sheila; Beers, Sue
Author Details:
Megan Beatty, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: beattym@pitt.edu; Mary E. Kerr; Sheila Alexander; Sue Beers
Abstract:
Introduction: Apolipoprotein (APOE) 4 allele has been associated with cognitive dysfunction in adults following repetitive concussive injury. The association between this allele and higher risk for neuropsychological deficits after severe TBI is unknown. Hypothesis: TBI subjects with the APOE 4 allele will exhibit poorer attention and memory function 6-months post-injury than subjects without this genetic marker. Methods: TBI subjects (N=45) ages 16-64 and Glasgow Coma Score equal to or less than 8 as measured in the field or on hospital admission without effects of paralytics or sedatives were entered into the study. Cerebral spinal fluid was sampled from the ventriculostomy by gravity drainage and stored at -80° C for genetic analysis. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Standardized tests of memory and attention administered by a trained technician included WAIS-R Digit Span, Buschke Selective Reminding Test (SRT), and Rey Complex Figure recall tests. Analyses included t-tests and regression analyses. Results: APOE 4 allele (APOE4+) was present in 10 of 45 TBI patients. The 2 groups did not differ in age (APOE4+=27.0+/-12.8; APOE4-=30.9+/-12.9). There were no significant differences between the presence or absence of the apoe4 allele and cognitive tests. There was a relationship between APOE alleles and rote memory (SRT Recall r=-26; p=.05). Regression analysis revealed that the APOE allele was a better predictor of SRT Recognition Memory at 6 months (t=-2.042; p=.05) than other factors such as severity of illness, age, gender. Conclusion: APOE alleles did not show attention and memory differences. There was a relationship between the APOE allele and rote memory performance. This study suggests that ones genetic make up may impact subtle but important aspects of cognitive integrity after TBI. It is not clear that these differences are a result of injury or a reflection of baseline cognitive capacities. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge development in Nursing: Awareness of the influence of the APOE genotype on memory will encourage tailored care in the acute period as well as during the rehab process to improve future outcomes in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of the APOE allele on memory following traumatic brain injury (TBI)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Meganen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeers, Sueen_US
dc.author.detailsMegan Beatty, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: beattym@pitt.edu; Mary E. Kerr; Sheila Alexander; Sue Beersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163583-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Apolipoprotein (APOE) 4 allele has been associated with cognitive dysfunction in adults following repetitive concussive injury. The association between this allele and higher risk for neuropsychological deficits after severe TBI is unknown. Hypothesis: TBI subjects with the APOE 4 allele will exhibit poorer attention and memory function 6-months post-injury than subjects without this genetic marker. Methods: TBI subjects (N=45) ages 16-64 and Glasgow Coma Score equal to or less than 8 as measured in the field or on hospital admission without effects of paralytics or sedatives were entered into the study. Cerebral spinal fluid was sampled from the ventriculostomy by gravity drainage and stored at -80° C for genetic analysis. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Standardized tests of memory and attention administered by a trained technician included WAIS-R Digit Span, Buschke Selective Reminding Test (SRT), and Rey Complex Figure recall tests. Analyses included t-tests and regression analyses. Results: APOE 4 allele (APOE4+) was present in 10 of 45 TBI patients. The 2 groups did not differ in age (APOE4+=27.0+/-12.8; APOE4-=30.9+/-12.9). There were no significant differences between the presence or absence of the apoe4 allele and cognitive tests. There was a relationship between APOE alleles and rote memory (SRT Recall r=-26; p=.05). Regression analysis revealed that the APOE allele was a better predictor of SRT Recognition Memory at 6 months (t=-2.042; p=.05) than other factors such as severity of illness, age, gender. Conclusion: APOE alleles did not show attention and memory differences. There was a relationship between the APOE allele and rote memory performance. This study suggests that ones genetic make up may impact subtle but important aspects of cognitive integrity after TBI. It is not clear that these differences are a result of injury or a reflection of baseline cognitive capacities. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge development in Nursing: Awareness of the influence of the APOE genotype on memory will encourage tailored care in the acute period as well as during the rehab process to improve future outcomes in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:06Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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