2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163584
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The use of qualitative data for health services research
Author(s):
Beidler, Susan; Bourbonnierre, Meg
Author Details:
Susan Beidler, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Shillington, Pennsylvania, USA, email: beidls@nursing.upenn.edu; Meg Bourbonnierre
Abstract:
Purpose: Health services research is most commonly associated with quantitative analysis of large data sets. Primary and secondary analysis of qualitative data sets, however, may help to explicate factors of interest to health services researchers. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the utility of qualitative data to inform health services research. Examples of ways in which qualitative methods have been used to inform recent programs of research are discussed. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to: 1) review several different types of primary qualitative data collection; 2) review the steps for secondary analysis of these data; 3) provide examples of the use of this method; 4) discuss inherent methodological considerations; 4) present ideas for further health services research based on the use of qualitative data. Framework: A methodological literature review, described by Broome (1993) in Rodgers & Knafl provided the framework for this presentation. Methodological reviews focus on critiquing the designs, methods, and analysis of a series of studies. Methods: Literature was identified through electronic database searches, using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and HealthSTAR, for the years 1966 -2001. Interviews of nurse researchers using qualitative methods of data analysis and hypothesis generation were also conducted. Results and Conclusions: Qualitative analysis in "traditional" health services research appears limited to organizational case studies, survey data, and telephone interviews. Methodologic categorization of qualitative research in nursing literature limits its consideration as health services research, thus contributing to nursing's invisibility in effecting quality outcomes. Secondary analysis of qualitative data and mixed method studies have the potential to illuminate factors that may be overlooked in the organization and delivery of care. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The depth and richness of qualitative data frequently provides insight into areas of inquiry not originally intended. The use of existing data sets can greatly reduce the cost of nursing research and minimize subject burden. Qualitative data sets may provide answers to contemporary health services concerns and more importantly, impact the timeliness and quality of nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe use of qualitative data for health services researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeidler, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBourbonnierre, Megen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Beidler, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Shillington, Pennsylvania, USA, email: beidls@nursing.upenn.edu; Meg Bourbonnierreen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163584-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Health services research is most commonly associated with quantitative analysis of large data sets. Primary and secondary analysis of qualitative data sets, however, may help to explicate factors of interest to health services researchers. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the utility of qualitative data to inform health services research. Examples of ways in which qualitative methods have been used to inform recent programs of research are discussed. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to: 1) review several different types of primary qualitative data collection; 2) review the steps for secondary analysis of these data; 3) provide examples of the use of this method; 4) discuss inherent methodological considerations; 4) present ideas for further health services research based on the use of qualitative data. Framework: A methodological literature review, described by Broome (1993) in Rodgers & Knafl provided the framework for this presentation. Methodological reviews focus on critiquing the designs, methods, and analysis of a series of studies. Methods: Literature was identified through electronic database searches, using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and HealthSTAR, for the years 1966 -2001. Interviews of nurse researchers using qualitative methods of data analysis and hypothesis generation were also conducted. Results and Conclusions: Qualitative analysis in "traditional" health services research appears limited to organizational case studies, survey data, and telephone interviews. Methodologic categorization of qualitative research in nursing literature limits its consideration as health services research, thus contributing to nursing's invisibility in effecting quality outcomes. Secondary analysis of qualitative data and mixed method studies have the potential to illuminate factors that may be overlooked in the organization and delivery of care. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The depth and richness of qualitative data frequently provides insight into areas of inquiry not originally intended. The use of existing data sets can greatly reduce the cost of nursing research and minimize subject burden. Qualitative data sets may provide answers to contemporary health services concerns and more importantly, impact the timeliness and quality of nursing interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:08Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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