The relationship of nursing faculties' psychological empowerment and their use of empowering teaching behaviors in baccalaureate nursing programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163591
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship of nursing faculties' psychological empowerment and their use of empowering teaching behaviors in baccalaureate nursing programs
Author(s):
Brancato, Vera
Author Details:
Vera Brancato, Kutztown University, School of Nursing, Spring City, Pennsylvania, USA, email: brancato@kutztown.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive-correlational research study was to describe the relationship among baccalaureate nursing faculties' use of empowering teaching behaviors, their sense of psychological empowerment in the workplace, and select demographic characteristics. Research Questions: 1. What empowering teaching behaviors do baccalaureate nursing faculties use? 2. What are the perceptions of nursing faculties about their sense of psychological empowerment? 3. What is the relationship among the perceptions of psychological empowerment, their use of empowering teaching behaviors, and select demographic variables? Theoretical Framework: Paulo Friere's pedagogy of the oppressed. Method: Multistage cluster sampling was utilized to obtain a random sample of 706 baccalaureate nursing faculty members representing 234 NLNAC accredited programs across the U.S. Each faculty member was sent 3 instruments: Carlson-Catalano's Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire, Spreitzer's Psychological Empowerment Instrument, and a data sheet. Results and Conclusions: The mean number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized was 19.5 out of 40 which indicates inadequate usage by faculty. Analytic and collegiality strategies were utilized the most with fewer use of change and sponsorship strategies. Nursing faculty identified that they had a strong sense of psychological empowerment except for having little impact over decision-making within their departments. A stepwise multiple regression equation revealed that the type of program, course work in empowerment, overall psychological empowerment, and the highest degree attained accounted for 14% of the variance in the number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized. Nursing Implications: Given the multitude of changes taking place in the health care system, nursing students need to be prepared educationally to assume a more powerful and active role in facilitating change effectively. Nursing faculty are the prime facilitators of this endeavor. In order to empower students, nursing faculties must not only feel empowered themselves, but must consistently strive to use empowering teaching behaviors. Faculties must utilize and model teaching strategies to allow students to practice empowerment in a safe educational environment. Future studies could investigate what specifically students believe aided them in feeling empowered when they assumed their positions in the workforce. A qualitative approach to better understand how faculty, as exemplars of empowerment, endeavor to provide effective educational opportunities for students. Graduate programs that prepare nursing faculty need to examine how they model and use empowering teaching strategies. Lastly, administrators of nursing programs need to examine the perceptions faculty have of their lack of input into decision-making in the department and how this may affect faculties' sense of psychological empowerment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship of nursing faculties' psychological empowerment and their use of empowering teaching behaviors in baccalaureate nursing programsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrancato, Veraen_US
dc.author.detailsVera Brancato, Kutztown University, School of Nursing, Spring City, Pennsylvania, USA, email: brancato@kutztown.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163591-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this descriptive-correlational research study was to describe the relationship among baccalaureate nursing faculties' use of empowering teaching behaviors, their sense of psychological empowerment in the workplace, and select demographic characteristics. Research Questions: 1. What empowering teaching behaviors do baccalaureate nursing faculties use? 2. What are the perceptions of nursing faculties about their sense of psychological empowerment? 3. What is the relationship among the perceptions of psychological empowerment, their use of empowering teaching behaviors, and select demographic variables? Theoretical Framework: Paulo Friere's pedagogy of the oppressed. Method: Multistage cluster sampling was utilized to obtain a random sample of 706 baccalaureate nursing faculty members representing 234 NLNAC accredited programs across the U.S. Each faculty member was sent 3 instruments: Carlson-Catalano's Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire, Spreitzer's Psychological Empowerment Instrument, and a data sheet. Results and Conclusions: The mean number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized was 19.5 out of 40 which indicates inadequate usage by faculty. Analytic and collegiality strategies were utilized the most with fewer use of change and sponsorship strategies. Nursing faculty identified that they had a strong sense of psychological empowerment except for having little impact over decision-making within their departments. A stepwise multiple regression equation revealed that the type of program, course work in empowerment, overall psychological empowerment, and the highest degree attained accounted for 14% of the variance in the number of empowering teaching behaviors utilized. Nursing Implications: Given the multitude of changes taking place in the health care system, nursing students need to be prepared educationally to assume a more powerful and active role in facilitating change effectively. Nursing faculty are the prime facilitators of this endeavor. In order to empower students, nursing faculties must not only feel empowered themselves, but must consistently strive to use empowering teaching behaviors. Faculties must utilize and model teaching strategies to allow students to practice empowerment in a safe educational environment. Future studies could investigate what specifically students believe aided them in feeling empowered when they assumed their positions in the workforce. A qualitative approach to better understand how faculty, as exemplars of empowerment, endeavor to provide effective educational opportunities for students. Graduate programs that prepare nursing faculty need to examine how they model and use empowering teaching strategies. Lastly, administrators of nursing programs need to examine the perceptions faculty have of their lack of input into decision-making in the department and how this may affect faculties' sense of psychological empowerment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:15Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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