2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163592
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast cancer adjustment in married and unmarried women
Author(s):
Budin, Wendy; Hoskins, Carol Noll
Author Details:
Wendy Budin, Associate Dean, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, South Orange , New Jersey, USA, email: budinwen@shu.edu; Carol Noll Hoskins
Abstract:
Problem/Objective: Breast cancer is a significant health problem among women. Although breast cancer is often diagnosed early, permitting options for less disfiguring surgery than in the past and follow-up treatment which allows for better control of side effects, the psychosocial impact of breast cancer is still profound. These women often journey through a maze of treatment alternatives with a wide array of physical, emotional, interpersonal and social implications. Although there is growing evidence that women with supportive husbands seem to adjust reasonably well, little is known about the impact of breast cancer among unmarried women. Some speculate that single women, widows, and divorcees may view their treatment as a serious deterrent to social and sexual activities, especially if they do not have a strong supportive partner. Although unmarried women with breast cancer may have very special adjustment needs, they have not been studied as a group in a systematic way. The literature is sparse about psychosocial adjustment to breast cancer among women with primary support systems other than the traditional married relationship. In this secondary analysis of the data sets from two larger studies, psychosocial adjustment outcomes are compared between a group of married women and a group of women who of were single, divorced, separated or widowed. Methods: The first data set consisting of 117 married women, comes from a longitudinal study of married women with breast cancer and their partners (Hoskins, 1997). The second data set is from a study of 101 unmarried women with breast cancer who completed a mail survey during the late post-operative recovery phase, approximately 6-8 weeks post surgery (Budin, 1998). Although the longitudinal study had eight data collection points over the course of one year, for this analysis, only the 60 day post-op data collection point was used be consistent with the time frame in the unmarried sample. Participants in both samples completed the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis, 1983) and provided demographic and medical data. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to compare adjustment outcomes between groups. Findings/Conclusions: Both the married and the unmarried women in these samples experienced relatively low levels of psychosocial adjustment problems during the late post operative recovery phase. Although there were no significant differences between the married and unmarried women in total adjustment scores, psychological distress, health care orientation, extended family relationships, or in the social environment, the unmarried women did score significantly higher (indicating more problems) in the vocational environment, domestic environment, and in sexual relations. Implications for nurses and other health care providers to facilitate positive adjustment to breast cancer in both married and unmarried women and directions for future studies are suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast cancer adjustment in married and unmarried womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBudin, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoskins, Carol Nollen_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Budin, Associate Dean, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, South Orange , New Jersey, USA, email: budinwen@shu.edu; Carol Noll Hoskinsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163592-
dc.description.abstractProblem/Objective: Breast cancer is a significant health problem among women. Although breast cancer is often diagnosed early, permitting options for less disfiguring surgery than in the past and follow-up treatment which allows for better control of side effects, the psychosocial impact of breast cancer is still profound. These women often journey through a maze of treatment alternatives with a wide array of physical, emotional, interpersonal and social implications. Although there is growing evidence that women with supportive husbands seem to adjust reasonably well, little is known about the impact of breast cancer among unmarried women. Some speculate that single women, widows, and divorcees may view their treatment as a serious deterrent to social and sexual activities, especially if they do not have a strong supportive partner. Although unmarried women with breast cancer may have very special adjustment needs, they have not been studied as a group in a systematic way. The literature is sparse about psychosocial adjustment to breast cancer among women with primary support systems other than the traditional married relationship. In this secondary analysis of the data sets from two larger studies, psychosocial adjustment outcomes are compared between a group of married women and a group of women who of were single, divorced, separated or widowed. Methods: The first data set consisting of 117 married women, comes from a longitudinal study of married women with breast cancer and their partners (Hoskins, 1997). The second data set is from a study of 101 unmarried women with breast cancer who completed a mail survey during the late post-operative recovery phase, approximately 6-8 weeks post surgery (Budin, 1998). Although the longitudinal study had eight data collection points over the course of one year, for this analysis, only the 60 day post-op data collection point was used be consistent with the time frame in the unmarried sample. Participants in both samples completed the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis, 1983) and provided demographic and medical data. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to compare adjustment outcomes between groups. Findings/Conclusions: Both the married and the unmarried women in these samples experienced relatively low levels of psychosocial adjustment problems during the late post operative recovery phase. Although there were no significant differences between the married and unmarried women in total adjustment scores, psychological distress, health care orientation, extended family relationships, or in the social environment, the unmarried women did score significantly higher (indicating more problems) in the vocational environment, domestic environment, and in sexual relations. Implications for nurses and other health care providers to facilitate positive adjustment to breast cancer in both married and unmarried women and directions for future studies are suggested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:16Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.