Diffusion of health care technology: A social historical case study of the Swan-Ganz catheter

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163593
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diffusion of health care technology: A social historical case study of the Swan-Ganz catheter
Author(s):
Burke, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Burke, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Essex Fells, New Jersey, USA, email: kmburke@ramapo.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This paper will use a social historical methodology to illuminate the significance of the gender, class, and politics in the development and diffusion of health care technology highlighting the role and influence of the nurse in technology decision making. Concepts: In most traditional studies of the development and diffusion of health care technology it is often assumed that technology is an objective external force that affects organizational structure. In this view the scientific rationale of technology rather than the technologic system are the focus of analysis. Because of this we have learned more about the "productive process" than the organizational process or forms that may have contributed to the history of technology. The social historical construction of technology allows us to see technology as a part of the political, social, and economic process influenced by gender. Specific Aims: This paper centers around two specific aims: 1) to explore the way in which the story of the Swan-Ganz catheter helps us understand how nurses and physicians make decisions regarding the use of health care technology in bedside clinical practice; 2) to address the significance of the social historical perspective in illuminating the social, cultural and economic factors that influence the development and diffusion of health care technology. Methods: A social historical case study of the Swan-Ganz catheter is used in this study to illuminate the role of nurses in the development and diffusion of health care technology. To illustrate this methodology oral histories of nurses and physicians who worked with the Swan-Ganz catheter during the 1970's will be used. Results and Conclusions: This case study illustrates the vital role of the nurse in the development and diffusion of health care technology used in the bedside care of patients. The nurses in the early 1970's, who worked with the Swan-Ganz catheter, made significant choices regarding how and when to use this new medical technology. The nurses reinvented this technology to meet the needs of their patients. They readily incorporated this technology into their patient care because they believed this technology would help them deliver better care to their patients. In addition, the use of this technology promoted their role in the hospital system giving more power and autonomy in the management of their patients. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: This social historical analysis illuminates current decision making processes regarding health care technology and makes visible the key role of the nurse in this complex process. The results of this broader analysis of the practices and decisions made by nurses have provided us with a better understanding of the current decision-making process regarding health care technology. This more informed understanding would shape future practice policies and guidelines regarding the appropriate use of health care technology.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiffusion of health care technology: A social historical case study of the Swan-Ganz catheteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Burke, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Essex Fells, New Jersey, USA, email: kmburke@ramapo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163593-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper will use a social historical methodology to illuminate the significance of the gender, class, and politics in the development and diffusion of health care technology highlighting the role and influence of the nurse in technology decision making. Concepts: In most traditional studies of the development and diffusion of health care technology it is often assumed that technology is an objective external force that affects organizational structure. In this view the scientific rationale of technology rather than the technologic system are the focus of analysis. Because of this we have learned more about the "productive process" than the organizational process or forms that may have contributed to the history of technology. The social historical construction of technology allows us to see technology as a part of the political, social, and economic process influenced by gender. Specific Aims: This paper centers around two specific aims: 1) to explore the way in which the story of the Swan-Ganz catheter helps us understand how nurses and physicians make decisions regarding the use of health care technology in bedside clinical practice; 2) to address the significance of the social historical perspective in illuminating the social, cultural and economic factors that influence the development and diffusion of health care technology. Methods: A social historical case study of the Swan-Ganz catheter is used in this study to illuminate the role of nurses in the development and diffusion of health care technology. To illustrate this methodology oral histories of nurses and physicians who worked with the Swan-Ganz catheter during the 1970's will be used. Results and Conclusions: This case study illustrates the vital role of the nurse in the development and diffusion of health care technology used in the bedside care of patients. The nurses in the early 1970's, who worked with the Swan-Ganz catheter, made significant choices regarding how and when to use this new medical technology. The nurses reinvented this technology to meet the needs of their patients. They readily incorporated this technology into their patient care because they believed this technology would help them deliver better care to their patients. In addition, the use of this technology promoted their role in the hospital system giving more power and autonomy in the management of their patients. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: This social historical analysis illuminates current decision making processes regarding health care technology and makes visible the key role of the nurse in this complex process. The results of this broader analysis of the practices and decisions made by nurses have provided us with a better understanding of the current decision-making process regarding health care technology. This more informed understanding would shape future practice policies and guidelines regarding the appropriate use of health care technology.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:17Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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