Evaluation of a writing intervention to increase protective factors in at-risk youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163596
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a writing intervention to increase protective factors in at-risk youth
Author(s):
Chandler, Genevieve
Author Details:
Genevieve Chandler, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: gec@nursing.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a ten week group writing component of "Voices from the 'Hood Leadership (VFTH) Youth Reach" project. Amherst's Writers and Artists Institute (AWAI) group writing method is an intervention designed to empower participants by developing their voice. ROL: Children growing up in socially toxic environments have increased risk during adolescence for affective and behavioral disturbances. Poverty, child abuse, parental substance abuse, absentee fathers and maternal incapacity have been associated with adolescent depression, smoking, drinking, violence and abuse. Resilience research suggests that these risks are reduced by developing protective factors of social competence, problem solving, self-esteem, a sense of future and positive connection to others. Studies on adolescent involvement in adult sanctioned, pro-social activities report a decrease in problem behaviors and an increase in risk-protective factors. Framework: Individual writing interventions based on inhibition theory have been shown to have a positive effect on health. Inhibition theory suggests writing translates traumatic experience into a linguistic structure, which promotes assimilation and reduces negative effects of the event. In a previous study increased self efficacy and self esteem was reported. Question: What is the internal and external effect of the writing intervention? Method: A descriptive design was used, including participant interviews and written evaluations of the intervention. Nursing students and youth (n = 7)18 -20 years old, were invited and voluntarily participated in the program. Semi-structured interviews focused on a) participants' experience with the writing intervention, b) effect of the writing group outside the weekly session. In data analysis interview data were content analyzed, by listening to the tapes, several readings of transcripts, extracting significant statements, developing themes and grouping into categories. Scientific rigor was assured by maintaining auditability, credibility and fittingness of the data. Preliminary results: Self knowledge, self-reflection, connection to others, change potential and future focus were evident in the results. Discussion: The AWAI brought together youth of different cultures, classes and socioeconomic status that in addition to fostering co-leader connections there was significant self and relational development. An un-intended finding was the learning and new understandings of each other's lifestyles: "I thought I had to write highly because of being with college kids" and "I was nervous because I wasn't in the 'hood," "it opens up situations they deal with and gives me strength plus you can understand why they have attitude." Implications: The cross-fertilization of current participants has led us to consider combining high- and low-risk youth in future groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a writing intervention to increase protective factors in at-risk youthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChandler, Genevieveen_US
dc.author.detailsGenevieve Chandler, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: gec@nursing.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163596-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a ten week group writing component of "Voices from the 'Hood Leadership (VFTH) Youth Reach" project. Amherst's Writers and Artists Institute (AWAI) group writing method is an intervention designed to empower participants by developing their voice. ROL: Children growing up in socially toxic environments have increased risk during adolescence for affective and behavioral disturbances. Poverty, child abuse, parental substance abuse, absentee fathers and maternal incapacity have been associated with adolescent depression, smoking, drinking, violence and abuse. Resilience research suggests that these risks are reduced by developing protective factors of social competence, problem solving, self-esteem, a sense of future and positive connection to others. Studies on adolescent involvement in adult sanctioned, pro-social activities report a decrease in problem behaviors and an increase in risk-protective factors. Framework: Individual writing interventions based on inhibition theory have been shown to have a positive effect on health. Inhibition theory suggests writing translates traumatic experience into a linguistic structure, which promotes assimilation and reduces negative effects of the event. In a previous study increased self efficacy and self esteem was reported. Question: What is the internal and external effect of the writing intervention? Method: A descriptive design was used, including participant interviews and written evaluations of the intervention. Nursing students and youth (n = 7)18 -20 years old, were invited and voluntarily participated in the program. Semi-structured interviews focused on a) participants' experience with the writing intervention, b) effect of the writing group outside the weekly session. In data analysis interview data were content analyzed, by listening to the tapes, several readings of transcripts, extracting significant statements, developing themes and grouping into categories. Scientific rigor was assured by maintaining auditability, credibility and fittingness of the data. Preliminary results: Self knowledge, self-reflection, connection to others, change potential and future focus were evident in the results. Discussion: The AWAI brought together youth of different cultures, classes and socioeconomic status that in addition to fostering co-leader connections there was significant self and relational development. An un-intended finding was the learning and new understandings of each other's lifestyles: "I thought I had to write highly because of being with college kids" and "I was nervous because I wasn't in the 'hood," "it opens up situations they deal with and gives me strength plus you can understand why they have attitude." Implications: The cross-fertilization of current participants has led us to consider combining high- and low-risk youth in future groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:20Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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