Quality of life and the psychiatric nursing role in working with individuals who have severe and persistent mental illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163597
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of life and the psychiatric nursing role in working with individuals who have severe and persistent mental illness
Author(s):
Clark, Beth
Author Details:
Beth Clark, Associate Professor, University of Maine-Augusta, Department of Nursing, Augusta, Maine, USA, email: eclark@maine.edu
Abstract:
This study sought to add to nursing theory surrounding the use of the concept of quality of life by nurses in clinical practice. Since there is virtually no literature related to the use of the concept by psychiatric nurses, the aim was to capture the practice wisdom of nurses working in community based settings. It asked the question, "In what way does the concept of quality of life guide the nursing practice of psychiatric nurses who work with individuals with severe and persistent mental illness in community based settings?" Using a grounded theory approach, transcripts from twenty semi-structured, in-depth interviews and two focus groups were analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis. Memos and reflexive journals were also included as data. The core concepts identified included quality of life as a gestalt for nursing practice and the subjective nature of quality of life. Nurses had difficulty defining quality of life and most often relied on a component definition. Nurses came to understand quality of life through examining their own lives, and then confronting case situations which provided a sharp contrast with their own notion of quality of life. As a gestalt, quality of life was described as a goal, the heart of psychiatric nursing, a lens, and a basis for understanding relationships. Because of the subjective nature of quality of life, nurses rarely used structured assessments, but chose to understand quality of life through knowing the patient and hearing the voice of the individual. Holism and the nurse patient relationship were central to understanding the patient's quality of life. Nurses made conscious efforts to minimize hierarchy in the relationship. To assist the client to meet his or her quality of life goals, nurses used approaches that were consistent with theories of caring, transcultural nursing, psychosocial rehabilitation, and developmental theory. The nurse's role included medication administration and monitoring, educating the patient and significant others, advocating for the patient, combating stigma, role modeling, "planting the seed", partnering and individualizing care. A quality of life framework led psychiatric nurses to a profound respect for and valuing of individuals who have severe mental illness. Quality of life is viewed as an important concept for psychiatric nursing practice, but is difficult to define and articulate. Further research could help to identify how nurses come to know about and apply the concept of quality of life, and to identify commonalities or differences in how the concept is defined and used in a variety of practice settings. The results of this study could have implications for nursing education, practice and research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of life and the psychiatric nursing role in working with individuals who have severe and persistent mental illnessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClark, Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsBeth Clark, Associate Professor, University of Maine-Augusta, Department of Nursing, Augusta, Maine, USA, email: eclark@maine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163597-
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to add to nursing theory surrounding the use of the concept of quality of life by nurses in clinical practice. Since there is virtually no literature related to the use of the concept by psychiatric nurses, the aim was to capture the practice wisdom of nurses working in community based settings. It asked the question, "In what way does the concept of quality of life guide the nursing practice of psychiatric nurses who work with individuals with severe and persistent mental illness in community based settings?" Using a grounded theory approach, transcripts from twenty semi-structured, in-depth interviews and two focus groups were analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis. Memos and reflexive journals were also included as data. The core concepts identified included quality of life as a gestalt for nursing practice and the subjective nature of quality of life. Nurses had difficulty defining quality of life and most often relied on a component definition. Nurses came to understand quality of life through examining their own lives, and then confronting case situations which provided a sharp contrast with their own notion of quality of life. As a gestalt, quality of life was described as a goal, the heart of psychiatric nursing, a lens, and a basis for understanding relationships. Because of the subjective nature of quality of life, nurses rarely used structured assessments, but chose to understand quality of life through knowing the patient and hearing the voice of the individual. Holism and the nurse patient relationship were central to understanding the patient's quality of life. Nurses made conscious efforts to minimize hierarchy in the relationship. To assist the client to meet his or her quality of life goals, nurses used approaches that were consistent with theories of caring, transcultural nursing, psychosocial rehabilitation, and developmental theory. The nurse's role included medication administration and monitoring, educating the patient and significant others, advocating for the patient, combating stigma, role modeling, "planting the seed", partnering and individualizing care. A quality of life framework led psychiatric nurses to a profound respect for and valuing of individuals who have severe mental illness. Quality of life is viewed as an important concept for psychiatric nursing practice, but is difficult to define and articulate. Further research could help to identify how nurses come to know about and apply the concept of quality of life, and to identify commonalities or differences in how the concept is defined and used in a variety of practice settings. The results of this study could have implications for nursing education, practice and research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:21Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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