2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163598
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating African-American men in the community about prostate cancer
Author(s):
Clarke-Tasker, Veronica
Author Details:
Veronica Clarke-Tasker, Professor, Howard University College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Washington DC, USA, email: vclarke-tasker@howard.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To apply the Health Belief Model in the measurement of African-American males' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of prostate cancer and early detection methods. The ultimate value of the information assessed from this population were used to design specific theory-based, culturally relevant interventions which may decrease mortality in this high-risk population. Specific Aims: Identify African-American males' perceptions of digital rectal examinations and prostate specific antigen blood test. Discuss nursing implications for educating African-American men about prostate cancer. Theoretical Framework/Model: Health Belief Model (1984). Methods: Two focus groups were conducted with African-American men whom ages ranged from 38 - 80. After consenting to audio-taping, participants completed a survey questionnaire and viewed a culturally appropriate video on prostate cancer. Results and Conclusions: Results indicate that, on average, the men believed in the efficacy of prostate early detection methods. Study participants felt physicians did not screen or suggest that they be screened for prostate cancer. Men between 40 - 50 years of age expressed concern about possible changes in their sex life if diagnosed with prostate cancer. Further, although their knowledge of prostate cancer was limited, they considered having a digital rectal examination embarrassing as well as uncomfortable. However, they were not opposed to having the procedure done. Implications for Nursing Practice: Results indicate a need for nurse practitioners and physicians to incorporate prostate cancer screening when conducting physical examinations for this high-risk population. Additional research exploring younger African-American men knowledge and perceptions of prostate cancer and early detection methods is strongly recommended. Nurses employed in hospitals and other clinical settings should incorporate teaching about the benefits of prostate cancer screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating African-American men in the community about prostate canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke-Tasker, Veronicaen_US
dc.author.detailsVeronica Clarke-Tasker, Professor, Howard University College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Washington DC, USA, email: vclarke-tasker@howard.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163598-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To apply the Health Belief Model in the measurement of African-American males' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of prostate cancer and early detection methods. The ultimate value of the information assessed from this population were used to design specific theory-based, culturally relevant interventions which may decrease mortality in this high-risk population. Specific Aims: Identify African-American males' perceptions of digital rectal examinations and prostate specific antigen blood test. Discuss nursing implications for educating African-American men about prostate cancer. Theoretical Framework/Model: Health Belief Model (1984). Methods: Two focus groups were conducted with African-American men whom ages ranged from 38 - 80. After consenting to audio-taping, participants completed a survey questionnaire and viewed a culturally appropriate video on prostate cancer. Results and Conclusions: Results indicate that, on average, the men believed in the efficacy of prostate early detection methods. Study participants felt physicians did not screen or suggest that they be screened for prostate cancer. Men between 40 - 50 years of age expressed concern about possible changes in their sex life if diagnosed with prostate cancer. Further, although their knowledge of prostate cancer was limited, they considered having a digital rectal examination embarrassing as well as uncomfortable. However, they were not opposed to having the procedure done. Implications for Nursing Practice: Results indicate a need for nurse practitioners and physicians to incorporate prostate cancer screening when conducting physical examinations for this high-risk population. Additional research exploring younger African-American men knowledge and perceptions of prostate cancer and early detection methods is strongly recommended. Nurses employed in hospitals and other clinical settings should incorporate teaching about the benefits of prostate cancer screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:23Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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