Effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention for Black and Hispanic college-age women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163607
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention for Black and Hispanic college-age women
Author(s):
D'Alonzo, Karen
Author Details:
Karen D'Alonzo, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University, College of Nursing, Somerville, New Jersey, USA, email: dalonzo@nursetech.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Recent trends indicate a sharp decline in participation in vigorous and moderate physical activity among teenage girls (YRBS, 1999). This downward trend continues throughout the college years and is markedly pronounced among Black and Hispanic college-age women. Few studies have focused on how to promote exercise among Black and Hispanic college-age women. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop and test a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention to achieve physical fitness among sedentary Black and Hispanic female college students. Research Questions: Among sedentary Black and Hispanic female college students: (1) 1)What are the effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on aerobic fitness, muscle strength and flexibility and anthropometry? (2) What are the effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on exercise self-efficacy and perception of benefits of and barriers to exercise? (3) What is the effect of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on maintenance of exercise behaviors? (4) What factors best predict successful participation in an exercise intervention and maintenance of exercise behaviors post intervention? Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1977, 1986, 1995, and 1997). Methods: A two-group crossover lag design with 43 women wherein subjects participate in a 16-week exercise intervention (step aerobics or kickboxing) 3 x per week. The format of the classes was designed using preliminary focus group data. Each session consists of a warm-up period, aerobic exercise, strength training and cool down. Dependent variables to be assessed pre and post intervention include exercise self-efficacy, exercise benefits and barriers, aerobic fitness, muscle strength, flexibility, body mass index, percent body fat and activity level. Activity level will also be assessed at 8 weeks post intervention. Body mass index, percentage of body fat, self-perception of body size and family history of exercise will be examined to determine their ability to predict successful completion of the exercise program and maintenance of activity post intervention. Data will be analyzed using paired t-tests, multiple regression analysis and ANOVA with post hoc procedures. Results and conclusions: Data were analyzed on 11 subjects who completed the exercise intervention during the spring of 2001. Preliminary findings showed significant improvements in perception of benefits and barriers (p = .039), flexibility (p = .035) and percentage of body fat (p = .041). A trend toward improvement in aerobic capacity was not significant (p = .084). Self-perception of body size was negatively associated with the number of weeks of participation in the study ( p= .045). The intervention will be repeated during the fall semester, with another wave of data collection scheduled for September-December 2001. Implications for nursing: This study will serve to identify barriers to exercise among Black and Hispanic college-age women and elucidate self-efficacy enhancing strategies to eliminate significant barriers. Successful completion of the exercise intervention should help participants to crystallize exercise as a life-long habit. In addition, the study will help identify the personal characteristics and determinants that are predictive of successful completion of an exercise program as well as maintenance of an exercise regime post intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention for Black and Hispanic college-age womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorD'Alonzo, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren D'Alonzo, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University, College of Nursing, Somerville, New Jersey, USA, email: dalonzo@nursetech.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163607-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Recent trends indicate a sharp decline in participation in vigorous and moderate physical activity among teenage girls (YRBS, 1999). This downward trend continues throughout the college years and is markedly pronounced among Black and Hispanic college-age women. Few studies have focused on how to promote exercise among Black and Hispanic college-age women. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop and test a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention to achieve physical fitness among sedentary Black and Hispanic female college students. Research Questions: Among sedentary Black and Hispanic female college students: (1) 1)What are the effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on aerobic fitness, muscle strength and flexibility and anthropometry? (2) What are the effects of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on exercise self-efficacy and perception of benefits of and barriers to exercise? (3) What is the effect of a self-efficacy enhancing exercise intervention on maintenance of exercise behaviors? (4) What factors best predict successful participation in an exercise intervention and maintenance of exercise behaviors post intervention? Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1977, 1986, 1995, and 1997). Methods: A two-group crossover lag design with 43 women wherein subjects participate in a 16-week exercise intervention (step aerobics or kickboxing) 3 x per week. The format of the classes was designed using preliminary focus group data. Each session consists of a warm-up period, aerobic exercise, strength training and cool down. Dependent variables to be assessed pre and post intervention include exercise self-efficacy, exercise benefits and barriers, aerobic fitness, muscle strength, flexibility, body mass index, percent body fat and activity level. Activity level will also be assessed at 8 weeks post intervention. Body mass index, percentage of body fat, self-perception of body size and family history of exercise will be examined to determine their ability to predict successful completion of the exercise program and maintenance of activity post intervention. Data will be analyzed using paired t-tests, multiple regression analysis and ANOVA with post hoc procedures. Results and conclusions: Data were analyzed on 11 subjects who completed the exercise intervention during the spring of 2001. Preliminary findings showed significant improvements in perception of benefits and barriers (p = .039), flexibility (p = .035) and percentage of body fat (p = .041). A trend toward improvement in aerobic capacity was not significant (p = .084). Self-perception of body size was negatively associated with the number of weeks of participation in the study ( p= .045). The intervention will be repeated during the fall semester, with another wave of data collection scheduled for September-December 2001. Implications for nursing: This study will serve to identify barriers to exercise among Black and Hispanic college-age women and elucidate self-efficacy enhancing strategies to eliminate significant barriers. Successful completion of the exercise intervention should help participants to crystallize exercise as a life-long habit. In addition, the study will help identify the personal characteristics and determinants that are predictive of successful completion of an exercise program as well as maintenance of an exercise regime post intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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