2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163612
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetic silencing: A family secret
Author(s):
Dylis, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Dylis, Quincy , Massachusetts, USA, email: dylis@bc.edu
Abstract:
Silencing can be defined as the absence of a verbal response, following a perceived powerful trigger, which communicates a message in the context of an interpersonal relationship (Dylis, in review). Conceptually, silencing is both fascinating and complicated because this absence of a voice, or in essence, "nothing" most definitely means "something". The purpose of this presentation is to explore the theoretical basis of silencing as it applies to genetic secrets using elements of concept analysis, and to apply these concepts to families living with genetic disorders using Rolland's Family Systems-Illness Model (1987). Many families keep "genetic" secrets which are examples of silencing behaviors. Different kinds of genetic secrets will be discussed and a case study of a family genetic secret will be presented. Rolland's Family Systems Model (1987) will provide the framework to illustrate the meaning and processing of the genetic secret presented in the case study. How the family system processes the meaning of genetic data will determine whether the resultant secret will either be a positive silencing response, representing empowerment, or a negative silencing response, representing vulnerability. Vulnerability and empowerment are strong, antithetical consequences. The positive and negative consequences of silencing have a tremendous impact on individual and family functioning. Nursing as a discipline must develop and refine interventions that maximize the positive outcomes of silencing and minimize or eliminate the negative ones. We must devise strategies and participate in policy decisions that will assist individuals to advocate for themselves so that silencing does not result in additional behaviors that threaten health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetic silencing: A family secreten_GB
dc.contributor.authorDylis, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Dylis, Quincy , Massachusetts, USA, email: dylis@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163612-
dc.description.abstractSilencing can be defined as the absence of a verbal response, following a perceived powerful trigger, which communicates a message in the context of an interpersonal relationship (Dylis, in review). Conceptually, silencing is both fascinating and complicated because this absence of a voice, or in essence, "nothing" most definitely means "something". The purpose of this presentation is to explore the theoretical basis of silencing as it applies to genetic secrets using elements of concept analysis, and to apply these concepts to families living with genetic disorders using Rolland's Family Systems-Illness Model (1987). Many families keep "genetic" secrets which are examples of silencing behaviors. Different kinds of genetic secrets will be discussed and a case study of a family genetic secret will be presented. Rolland's Family Systems Model (1987) will provide the framework to illustrate the meaning and processing of the genetic secret presented in the case study. How the family system processes the meaning of genetic data will determine whether the resultant secret will either be a positive silencing response, representing empowerment, or a negative silencing response, representing vulnerability. Vulnerability and empowerment are strong, antithetical consequences. The positive and negative consequences of silencing have a tremendous impact on individual and family functioning. Nursing as a discipline must develop and refine interventions that maximize the positive outcomes of silencing and minimize or eliminate the negative ones. We must devise strategies and participate in policy decisions that will assist individuals to advocate for themselves so that silencing does not result in additional behaviors that threaten health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:38Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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